Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Active transportation (73)

The climate case for building 15-minute neighbourhoods

Ecology Ottawa / Accessed 06 September 2020

The links between urban sprawl and climate change are well-documented in cities and regions around the world, but are perhaps best encapsulated for Ottawa’s context by former Environmental Commissioner of Ontario Dr. Dianne Saxe. Dr. Saxe has called urban sprawl “Ontario’s oil sands” – it’s the province’s main driver of greenhouse gas emissions, has a wide array of other environmental costs, and is bound up with a complex web of political and financial interests that benefit from the status quo.

More sprawl means people must travel further – often by car – to get to jobs and basic amenities. It also typically means more carbon-intensive housing patterns, with energy inefficient single-detached homes dominating instead of more compact forms. In Ontario (the Toronto area is shown below), there’s a clear link between climate pollution and urban form – with dense, walkable communities seeing the lowest levels of emissions.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Highway 401 Planning Study – Brockville

Stantec Consulting Ltd. / Accessed 28 August 2020

The Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO) has retained Stantec Consulting Ltd. to undertake a Planning, Preliminary Design, and Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA) Study on Highway 401 for the rehabilitation and/or replacement of structures; interchange modifications; and establishing the footprint of future six and eight lanes, to address current and future transportation needs, from 2 km west of Stewart Boulevard to 750 m east of Augusta Road, a length of approximately 4.5 km within the City of Brockville.

You are encouraged to participate in the study and to provide comments in writing to the study team. If you wish to have your name added to the study mailing list please click here to contact the study team.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Feds unveil new COVID-19 stream for provincial infrastructure

National Post / Mia Rabson / 12 May 2020

“We have adapted our infrastructure program to the new reality of COVID,” said [Infrastructure Minister Catherine] McKenna.

It will include things like retrofitting health-care facilities and schools, particularly with a view to allowing for more physical distancing and making it easier to practise good hygiene like handwashing. Projects to help people find ways to get outside safely will also be a priority, such as new or better paths, bike lanes, and nature trails.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Counties adopt paved-shoulders policy

Recorder & Times / Wayne Lowrie / 24 January 2020

The United Counties of Leeds and Grenville will begin paving the shoulders of major counties roads when they are rebuilt.

The paved-shoulders policy, long advocated by cyclists and safety experts, was approved unanimously by counties council this week.

Adding a 1.5-metre paved strip on each side of a new road would add about $35,000 per kilometre to construction costs, Arup Mukherjee, public works director, told council in a report.

And although the paved shoulders would be widely used by cyclists, Mukherjee cautioned that they wouldn’t be called bike lanes.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Modified Active Transportation Plan passes

Transition Brockville / 19 January 2020

City of Brockville staff have confirmed that, with the motion passed by Council this week, the City now has an Active Transportation Plan (ATP) in place, qualifying it for funding under some upper tier government programs.

As explained in a misleadingly-titled Recorder & Times article, this plan includes modifications, but is largely based on the draft ATP submitted by the consulting firm Alta Planning last September.

[ R&T ARTICLE ]

Town counts on transit, urban design to protect rural flavour

The Energy Mix / 06 December 2019

Drawing inspiration from sources as diverse as the garden city movement of the early 20th century, Israel’s cooperative moshavs, and the annual Burning Man event, the town council of Innisfil, Ontario has developed a new model of suburban intensification built around nature, two wheels, and walking, in a bid to protect the good things about rural life […]

Architect and design leader Alex Josephson of Toronto-based Partisans said the “next-generation community” will be “for people who want access to a big city, but also nature and everything that comes with living in a rural community.”

Combining the customary grid-based street plan of today’s typical development with “some degree of irregularity, and lots of cut-throughs for pedestrians,” the Orbit is “radical,” the Globe and Mail writes. That’s a characterization that suits Innisfil just fine, as it moves to preserve its rural essence even as it “faces huge pressure to grow from its current 36,000 people”.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
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