Transition Brockville archive

Tag : Active transportation (70)

Counties adopt paved-shoulders policy

Recorder & Times / Wayne Lowrie / 24 January 2020

The United Counties of Leeds and Grenville will begin paving the shoulders of major counties roads when they are rebuilt.

The paved-shoulders policy, long advocated by cyclists and safety experts, was approved unanimously by counties council this week.

Adding a 1.5-metre paved strip on each side of a new road would add about $35,000 per kilometre to construction costs, Arup Mukherjee, public works director, told council in a report.

And although the paved shoulders would be widely used by cyclists, Mukherjee cautioned that they wouldn’t be called bike lanes.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Modified Active Transportation Plan passes

Transition Brockville / 19 January 2020

City of Brockville staff have confirmed that, with the motion passed by Council this week, the City now has an Active Transportation Plan (ATP) in place, qualifying it for funding under some upper tier government programs.

As explained in a misleadingly-titled Recorder & Times article, this plan includes modifications, but is largely based on the draft ATP submitted by the consulting firm Alta Planning last September.

[ R&T ARTICLE ]

Town counts on transit, urban design to protect rural flavour

The Energy Mix / 06 December 2019

Drawing inspiration from sources as diverse as the garden city movement of the early 20th century, Israel’s cooperative moshavs, and the annual Burning Man event, the town council of Innisfil, Ontario has developed a new model of suburban intensification built around nature, two wheels, and walking, in a bid to protect the good things about rural life […]

Architect and design leader Alex Josephson of Toronto-based Partisans said the “next-generation community” will be “for people who want access to a big city, but also nature and everything that comes with living in a rural community.”

Combining the customary grid-based street plan of today’s typical development with “some degree of irregularity, and lots of cut-throughs for pedestrians,” the Orbit is “radical,” the Globe and Mail writes. That’s a characterization that suits Innisfil just fine, as it moves to preserve its rural essence even as it “faces huge pressure to grow from its current 36,000 people”.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

TB comments on Brockville’s draft Active Transportation Plan

Transition Brockville / 11 November 2019

Steering Committee member Patricia Sutherland presented TB’s position on the City’s draft Active Transportation Plan at the public meeting of the Planning and Operations Committee on Tuesday, Nov. 5.

Stark differences on bike lanes

Recorder & Times / Ronald Zajac / 06 November 2019

They are pedalling in opposite directions, but the two sides in Brockville’s bike lanes debate stayed in their lanes on Tuesday.

Supporters of the city’s proposed active transportation plan touted its health and social benefits, while opponents, focused mainly on plans to put bike lanes on Laurier Boulevard and Windsor Drive, worried about traffic safety in that area.

So intense was the interest in the matter that city council’s planning and operations committee moved the venue of Tuesday’s public meeting from city hall to the Brockville Arts Centre. But while the debate remains as polarized as ever, committee chairman Coun. Mike Kalivas thanked the many participants for keeping the debate civil and proceeding in a “very classy way.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Public meeting: Active Transportation Plan

Active Brockville / 09 October 2019

Everyone interested in seeing Brockville move into the 21st century as a community that values safe and equitable opportunities to choose your mode of travel each and every time out, regardless of age or ability, and that is better able to compete in attracting and retaining talent, families, jobs, and business investment, please plan on attending this public session.

The Active Transportation plan is a city-wide plan to develop a more walkable and bikeable community. It is orders of magnitude bigger and more important than bike lanes on one street.

As with any public meeting, expect that the minority special interest groups opposed to progress will be there and will be loud. Now is not the time to be quiet and watch. Now is the time to register as a delegation and speak up for a healthier future for our city.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
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