Flipping Canada’s carbon price debate

National Post / John Ivison / 19 September 2018

The Liberals’ Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act requires Ottawa to return tax revenue to the province where it was raised in cases where it has imposed a “backstop” carbon tax in the absence of a recognized provincial climate plan. Trudeau has indicated that, rather than sending a rebate to the governments of those provinces, he may choose to send the money directly to its households.

Research by environmental economist Dave Sawyer of EnviroEconomics suggests that in this scenario most households, regardless of income level, would receive more money from the federal government than they would pay in carbon taxes.

The Conservatives have long railed against the Liberals’ “tax on everything” but the study of three provinces suggests those households — particularly at the lower end of the income spectrum — would end up better off. The amount they receive would rise over time in line with the direct carbon tax, which will start at $20-per-tonne next January and rise to $50-a-tonne in 2022.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Resilience: Transforming our Community

Resilience Doc / 23 August 2018

The film focuses on climate change in the Grey/Bruce region, but applies to all communities, large or small. Marine scientist Dr. John Anderson explains the problem. How climate change will affect us and what we can do about it. The film is designed to inspire action, using facilitated post-screening discussions. “It’s so hard to know where to start,” says John. “Change our light bulbs? Drive less? Eat less meat? But the trouble is if we act as individuals, it’s just too little. If we wait for governments to act, it will be too late. But if we work together as a community, it might just be in time.”

Beyond Crisis – a hopeful film about meeting the challenge

Transition Brockville / 18 September 2018

If you know climate change is a challenge that must be faced, but you don’t know how to talk about it with your family and friends, Beyond Crisis is a film that aims to help you find a way.

Transition Brockville’s next presentation is a free public screening of Beyond Crisis, Sunday, September 23, at 2 p.m. in the Brockville Public Library. Following the film, Lynn Ovenden, of the Citizens’ Climate Lobby, will facilitate a discussion.

“It’s my hope that people will leave our meeting feeling encouraged and a lot more energized” to talk to others about acting on climate change, says Ovenden. A new grandmother, retired government biologist, and longtime field biologist, Ovenden lives near Casselman, Ontario. Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL) is a non-partisan grassroots advocacy organization focused on national policies to address climate change. Ovenden signed up with CCL Canada (NCR Chapter) in 2016 to help build the political will for effective climate action.

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Trees and lengthy drought

The Edible Garden / Edythe Falconer / September 2018

Large trees shelter humans, understorey trees, shrubs, flower beds and vegetable gardens. Besides providing shelter, shade and privacy, trees are psychologically beneficial. And trees hold soil in place. In order to provide all of these benefits, a tree must take its own fair share of moisture and nutrition from the soil it grows in. In dry times they may compromise the welfare of other trees and plants within their growing space as they reach out for what they need. The root systems of large trees are vast.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Ford has decided to consult Ontario about climate change

National Observer / Steph Wechsler / 12 September 2018

Premier Doug Ford’s government has decided to consult Ontarians about its climate change policies, one day after it was taken to court for “unlawfully” scrapping action to reduce carbon pollution.

The government’s Environment Ministry opened an online portal to seek public feedback about what it should do about climate change, pledging to use the information collected in order to introduce a new plan. Ontario is Canada most populous province and makes up a key component of the country’s national efforts to meet its international climate change goals.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

How should we face the challenge of climate change?

Al Jazeera News / 14 September 2018

Much of the world’s attention this week has been focused on two powerful storms: Hurricane Florence in the United States and Super Typhoon Mangkhut in the Philippines.

The signs of climate change are everywhere, and what were once rare forces of nature are becoming almost regular events.

The Atlantic hurricane season lasts longer, and the storms are more powerful than they were a generation ago.

Across the continent, wildfires in California have burned one million acres (404,685 hectares) of land this year. Experts say the US wildfire season is 87 days longer than it was 30 years ago.

Europe has just come through a summer of record heat that saw wildfires break out above the Arctic circle.

Record rainfall in Japan triggered landslides that smashed homes and forced evacuations. That was followed by two weeks of severe heat.

But what can we do to tackle climate change?

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The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
TB Projects

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