New Abbey Dawn Solar Project already feeding the grid

KingstonRegion.com / Tori Stafford / 04 June 2017

Local group Wintergreen Renewable Energy Co-op and SolarShare, a provincial solar energy co-op, hosted a tour and celebration at their Abbey Dawn Project on Sunday, June 4. There, a few dozen people toured the brand new 500 kW solar project, learning about the state-of-the-art tracker technology the project uses, and about how the system operates. The Abbey Dawn Project is the first in Canada to use Canadian company Morgan Solar’s Savanna dual-axis tracker technology, which follows the sun’s daily east-to-west path and seasonal changes in its elevation.

In short, the technology allows the system to run more efficiently, with yield increases of 25 to 40 per cent over those without the tracker technology.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Surviving a hostile climate on local food: Michael Brownlee

Conversation Earth / Dave Gardner / 06 June 2017

A scaled-up local food system may be the only way we can feed ourselves as we weather the storm of climate change. Until now, CSAs, urban gardens and farmer’s markets have been the face of the local food movement. But Michael Brownlee, author of The Local Food Revolution: How Humanity Will Feed Itself in Uncertain Times, tells us this is not nearly enough. In this episode, the first of a two-part conversation, Brownlee shares how global industrial agriculture is failing us, and can’t adapt to the coming climate changes. He advocates relocalizing our food supply chain in order to adapt and survive.

Downtown Brockville plugs in for EVs

Recorder & Times / Wayne Lowrie / 03 June 2017

Downtown Brockville has its first public charging units for electric vehicles.

The two Level 2 EV charging units are located in the underground parking parking garage at the Aquatarium.

The charging is free, but users would pay the $3-per-hour fee to park.

The Thousand Islands Community Development Corporation, the City of Brockville, the Downtown Business Improvement Area, the Aquatarium and 401 Electric chipped in to pay for stations.

The city, DBIA and the chamber of commerce hope that the charging stations will act as a magnet to attract electric cars on the 401 to the downtown.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Reporting invasive species

Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources

In Ontario, there are numerous agencies and monitoring programs in place that collect information and/or identify the distribution of invasive species. Monitoring programs generate large quantities of data, often covering a wide geographic area, multiple species, and lengthy time periods. Invasive species cross jurisdictional boundaries, so it is important to be able to share monitoring information with neighbouring provinces and states, and with the federal government. Effective data management improves our ability to detect and respond to invasive species, while avoiding duplication of effort.

EDDMapS documents the presence of invasive species. A simple, interactive Web interface enables participants to submit their observations or view results through interactive queries into the EDDMapS database. EDDMapS encourages users to participate by providing Internet tools that maintain their personal records and enable them to visualize data with interactive maps.

Users simply enter information from their observations into the standardized on-line data form, which allows specific information about the infestation and images to be added. Information entered is immediately loaded to the EDDMapS website for verification.

[ EDDMapS ONTARIO ]

Antarctic ice loss 2002-2016

NASA Climate Change / 19 May 2017

These images, created with GRACE data, show changes in Antarctic ice mass since 2002. Orange and red shades indicate areas that lost ice mass, while light blue shades indicate areas that gained ice mass. White indicates areas where there has been very little or no change in ice mass since 2002. In general, areas near the center of Antarctica experienced small amounts of positive or negative change, while the West Antarctic Ice Sheet experienced a significant ice mass loss (dark red) over the fourteen-year period. Floating ice shelves whose mass GRACE doesn’t measure are colored gray.

How to keep cool without air conditioning

Mother Earth News / Stan Cox / August/September 2015

At current usage rates, air conditioning U.S. homes, businesses, schools and vehicles releases fossil carbon and fluorocarbon refrigerants that have a total annual global-warming impact equivalent to a half-billion tons of carbon dioxide. Eliminating these emissions from air conditioning would benefit the atmosphere as much as shutting down 140 typical coal-fired power plants would.

Air conditioning also eats a sizable chunk of our budgets. In the United States, I estimate that our collective annual electric bill for cooling our homes is about $30 billion. The yearly cost per household ranges from about $200 in the Northeast to more than $450 in the sweltering South.

So, how do we wean ourselves off of this energy-intensive habit? The range of natural ways to cool your home depends on where you live: in the North or South, on a forested hillside or in an urban heat island, in an apartment or a house. But whatever your situation, you can find natural cooling methods to stay comfortable without air conditioning — starting by adjusting your internal dial.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

«page 3 of 280»

The Transition Framework

Transition initiatives share many of the same goals as other groups, and works collaboratively with a variety of organizations in their local areas. Transition differs in that it focuses specifically on preparing communities for the changes associated with unprecedented resource depletion and transitioning away from fossil-fuel dependency.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Like to receive a monthly digest of our key posts plus local news and event listings?

Subscribe

View past issues

Subscribe to our Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.