25 tips for going local without going crazy

New Society Publishers / Julia Shanks, Brett Grohsgal / 04 April 2016

Locally sourced and seasonally raised foods taste better, and are better for you. They spend more time in the fields ripening – developing sweetness and flavor – because they don’t need to be picked under-ripe for shipping. Picking under-ripe vegetables also reduces the nutritional value. Farmers can grow more diverse varieties, bred for quality and flavor rather than long shelf life. And though a region may experience a drought or unusually cold weather for a season, the fruits and vegetables still grow at their optimal time, ensuring the best possible taste. Picking under-ripe vegetables reduces the nutritional value.

Buying local also benefits the environment and economy.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Brockville’s Active Transportation plan invites your input

City of Brockville / Matthew Locke

The Social Pinpoint engagement site for the Brockville Active Transportation Plan invites your input:

1. Browse the concept tab for ideas about different active transportation facilities and terminology.

2. Drag and drop pins onto the map to tell us your active transportation experiences in Brockville (walking, cycling, etc).The map shows existing active transportation facilities and previously proposed trails.

3. Complete the survey questions in the sidebar tab.

To provide your input and for more information, please visit the project webpage at https://brockville.com/activetransportation. The online engagement for this phase of the project will close in mid-March 2019.

Kingston’s climate change strategy is number one in country

TVO Current Affairs / David Rockne Corrigan / 14 December 2018

The municipality that has billed itself as “Canada’s most sustainable city” since 2009 now has some solid evidence to back up the claim.

The November issue of the journal Climatic Change contains a ranking of the climate-change plans of 63 Canadian municipalities — and Kingston comes out on top.

Plans were evaluated based on eight criteria, including how a community sets its climate goals, how effective those goals are, and how it measures and achieves progress.

Municipalities are the “most vulnerable” of all levels of government when it comes to climate change, explains lead author Dave Guyadeen, of the University of Guelph, because they face the most immediate impacts. ”So we wanted to know how they are responding to it,” he says.

So what lessons can Kingston offer other municipalities trying to come up with or improve climate-change plans?

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Chamber of Commerce solidly backs carbon pricing

CBC News / Emily Chung / 17 December 2018

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce says the business community in Canada is solidly backing carbon pricing as the way for it to “play its part in the fight against climate change” — and it wants governments to stop playing politics and waffling about it.

The group, which bills itself as “the voice of Canadian business” and represents 200,000 companies across the country, released a report this past week, as international climate talks were wrapping up in Katowice, Poland, arguing strongly in favour of carbon pricing such as carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems. It sees this as the most cost-effective way to transition Canada to a low-carbon economy and proposes how it would like to see carbon pricing implemented.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Scientists study climate change grief

Yahoo News / CP / 13 December 2018

Mental-health researchers around the world are taking notice of what people feel when the world they’ve always known changes gradually or suddenly from climate change. Some call it environmental grief, some call it solastalgia — a word coined for a feeling of homesickness when home changes around you.

The American Psychological Association has released a lengthy report into solastalgia. So has the British medical journal The Lancet. Australian farmers report rising levels of depression as their drought-stricken lands blow away. An international group of climate scientists maintain a website entitled Is This How You Feel?

House of Commons committees have discussed it. Health Canada is exploring the topic.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Drink more wine, eat more chocolate

GrowthBusters / Dave Gardner / 06 December 2018

The conversation in this episode may start you on a course that can set you free and bring you peace of mind. It may be your key to sustainable living. GrowthBusters’ Dave Gardner is joined by Jennifer Cohen and Gina LaRoche, authors of The Seven Laws of Enough: Cultivating a Life of Sustainable Abundance for a discussion of “Sustainable Abundance.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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