Voluntary Simplicity, followed by a party

Transition Brockville / 11 April 2017

A vacation from our high-tech, high-pressure lives is always welcome. But what if we could make that freedom and contentment with life permanent, instead of returning to the rat race after a one- or two-week escape?

An alternative way of living, called Voluntary Simplicity – or sometimes the Simpler Way – will be discussed at the next Transition Brockville presentation on Sunday, April 23, 2 p.m., at the Brockville Public Library.

Chris Stesky, a member of the Transition Brockville steering committee, will introduce the concept, offer some insights from her experience, and invite the audience to share stories from their own journey toward a simpler life.

Following the discussion, everyone is invited to a celebrate Transition Brockville’s 10th anniversary. There will be a look back at the group’s history, appreciation of those who have contributed over the years, and a delicious cake and treats.

[ more… ]

Wanted! Tiny house manufacturers and owners

Beyond Events / 11 April 2017

Help us bring Ontario to the forefront of the Tiny House movement by exhibiting your tiny house at Ontario’s first (and finest) Tiny House Festival – [to be held in Perth and] following the example of Quebec’s successful “Festival Mini-Maisons.” Details follow.

The goal of the festival is to inspire and explore options to reduce the ecological footprint in the construction of homes. The festival provides an important opportunity to market products and services and promote businesses to an appreciative and informed audience.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Can living with less make you happier?

The Guardian / Fumio Sasaki / 12 April 2017

Minimalism is a lifestyle in which you reduce your possessions to the least possible. Living with only the bare essentials has not only provided superficial benefits such as the pleasure of a tidy room or the simple ease of cleaning, it has also led to a more fundamental shift. It’s given me a chance to think about what it really means to be happy.

We think that the more we have, the happier we will be. We never know what tomorrow might bring, so we collect and save as much as we can. This means we need a lot of money, so we gradually start judging people by how much money they have. You convince yourself that you need to make a lot of money so you don’t miss out on success. And for you to make money, you need everyone else to spend their money. And so it goes.

So I said goodbye to a lot of things, many of which I’d had for years. And yet now I live each day with a happier spirit. I feel more content now than I ever did in the past.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Most billion-dollar weather disasters for a 1st quarter

The Weather Network / Jonathan Belles / 07 April 2017

The first three months of 2017 claimed the most billion-dollar weather disasters for the same stretch of any year on record, according to a report released Thursday by NOAA.

Five separate disasters, ranging from tornado outbreaks and wind damage to late season freezes that wiped out crops in the South, racked up damage tolls over $1 billion.

This frequency of billion-dollar events is the largest since records began in 1980 and more than doubles the average number of 2.4 such disasters over the last five years.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Experiencing ‘eco-anxiety’?

CBC The Current / 06 April 2017

“Eco-anxiety” has become a short-hand description for symptoms that psychologists are starting to see from Nunavut to Australia and beyond.

That feeling of distress is detailed in a new report by the American Psychological Association that suggests worrying about climate change is having a serious impact on our mental health, and it’s something they say we need to pay a lot more attention to.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

New study links carbon pollution to extreme weather

The Guardian / John Abraham / 07 April 2017

It was only a few weeks ago that I wrote about changes to extreme weather in a warming world. That prior article dealt with the increase of extreme precipitation events as the Earth warms. I termed the relationship a thermodynamic one; it was driven by local thermodynamic processes. But extreme weather can also occur because of large-scale changes to the atmosphere and oceans. This issue is the topic of another just-published paper that makes a convincing case for a whole new type of influence of humans on extreme weather. In a certain sense, this study confirms what was previously reported here and here. With the march of science, the tools, methods, and evidence get better each year.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]  [ TB: This emerging discussion was mentioned by TB in its presentation to the Brockville & District Chamber of Commerce at its Green Summit back in 2013. ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

 

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