Ontarians are paying for climate change. They deserve a plan

Clean Energy Canada / Fernando Melo / 26 September 2018

Ontarians awoke to a cold reality check Tuesday morning—in a province that’s literally heating up.

Environmental Commissioner of Ontario Dianne Saxe didn’t mince words in her 2018 Greenhouse Gas Progress Report when she stated the size of the problem. The province is warming faster than the global average—Ontario is 1.5°C hotter than it was in 1948—with no clear plan in place to address the challenge.

This rapid warming can significantly increase the likeliness of extreme weather events, which plagued the province in 2018—and which in the first months of this year inflicted nearly $1 billion in insured damage and another $1 billion in uninsured damage.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Older generations can teach us about plastic-free living

Treehugger / Katherine Martinko / 27 September 2018

At first glance, the future looks high-tech and cutting-edge. There’s a sense that we need to move beyond single-use plastics to solutions that only science can give us. But what if we’re heading in the wrong direction? What if the most straightforward answers to our problem lie in the past?

We didn’t always have a plastic pollution problem. Before the mid-20th century, people made do without it and, presumably, as Mark Blackburn put it descriptively in an article for One Brown Planet, they were not lying “in the streets, malnourished and dehydrated, like a scene from some apocalyptic war,” for lack of plastic water bottles. They managed just fine because their lifestyle habits were different.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Mulch: Multitude of benefits

Mother Earth News / Charlyn Ellis / 05 August 2015

The Willamette Valley, usually known for it’s darn near perfect summers—dry, breezy, in the eighties with cool nights—has seen two serious heat waves this summer. One came at the end of June, the second at the end of July. Both were problematic for crops, as they came right when many young transplants were settling into the fields. My own small scale fall and winter garden went in about four days before the second heat wave. How could I keep them alive in the blazing afternoon sun when their roots were not reaching deep into the soil? I mulched. First, I worked all of the residual mulch from the early potato crop into the bed. Then I nested each start in a base of straw mulch laid over the ground and soaker hoses. They all came through. Mulch. Straw, leaves, winter cover crops, cardboard or woodshavings … it’s useful stuff. Placed neatly around the base of young plants and later worked into the soil, it has a multitude of benefits.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Brockville backs active transportation plan

Recorder & Times / Ronald Zajac / 26 September 2018

A change of heart by Mayor David Henderson means Brockville will get its active transportation plan after all.

City council on Tuesday voted down a recommendation by its finance, administration and operations committee – one Henderson supported last week at that committee meeting – which would have diverted money from the preparation of the plan to physical improvements on the Brock Trail.

The mayor said the fact the Brock Trail committee was itself supporting the active transportation plan contributed in part to his change of heart.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]  [ SOME BACKGROUND ON ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION ]

Walking the rural way in Leeds, Grenville and Lanark

Eastern Ontario Active Transportation Network / Fall 2018 Newsletter

The Leeds, Grenville & Lanark (LGL) District Health Unit, in partnership with active school travel stakeholders in Brockville, Smiths Falls and Mississippi Mills, was successful in receiving $100,000 over two years to pilot the “Walking the Rural Way” Project. This project will operationalize “community tailored” Walking School Bus (WSB) models, using trained adult leaders to walk with elementary school children, on established routes to school. Similar to a yellow school bus, a WSB has designated “bus stops” and “pick up times”, where children and families are encouraged to join. The project is supported by Ontario Active School Travel, a program of Green Communities Canada with funding from the Government of Ontario.

The following six schools are scheduled to participate in the first year of the “Walking the Rural Way” Project:

  • Westminster Public School (Brockville)
  • Commonwealth Public School (Brockville)
  • Chimo Elementary School (Smiths Falls)
  • Duncan J Schoular Public School (Smiths Falls)
  • St. Francis de Sales Catholic School (Smiths Falls)
  • R. Tait McKenzie Public School (Mississippi Mills)

Brockville schools will be running the Walking School Bus on Walking Wednesdays, with Westminster school using a before and after school model, while Commonwealth will start with mornings only. Smiths Falls will be piloting a Monday to Friday model, mornings only. The Walking School Bus will run from October to November 2018, and start up again April to end of June, 2019.

For more information, visit http://healthunit.org/health-information/physical-activity-rest/active-school-travel/ or e-mail WalkingSchoolBus_LGL@healthunit.org

Making homemade broth and stock

Mother Earth News / Andrea Chesman / October/November 2018

Nothing beats the convenience of having homemade broth and stock on hand in your kitchen. Homemade broths and stocks taste better than canned broths, bouillon cubes and pastes, and even expensive boxed broths. In addition, you’ll reduce your kitchen waste if you extract the flavor that remains in bones and vegetable peelings after the other parts are consumed.

But what do you call the simmering mixture in your pot? Is it broth, or is it stock? The two terms are often used interchangeably, and definitions do vary, so it depends on who you ask. But, in a nutshell, stock is the gelatinous result of cooking vegetables and bones in unseasoned water for several hours to extract flavor, while broth is made out of vegetables and meat simmered in a seasoned liquid for a shorter period of time. Either one can serve as a foundation for other dishes, but because broth is typically seasoned, it’s often consumed on its own, while stock is the perfect rich-tasting base onto which you can layer other flavors.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Transition initiatives share many of the same goals as other groups, and work collaboratively with a variety of organizations in their local areas. Transition differs in that it focuses specifically on preparing communities for the changes associated with unprecedented resource depletion and transitioning away from fossil-fuel dependency.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

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