EV shopping

Clean Energy Canada / 18 January 2021

With more EV models coming onto the market, there is more choice than ever. To help narrow down your electric options, Plug ‘n Drive has produced this useful new tool that allows you to tailor the search to suit your individual commuting needs by comparing range, price, cost, and more.

The Carbon Skyscraper

Climate Central / Benjamin Strauss / 13 January 2021

Speed kills.

That’s why firing bullets from a gun is more dangerous than tossing them by hand. Why skydivers use parachutes. Why roads have speed limits. And why it’s critical to understand how quickly human activity will drive the climate to change, compared to past rates. Will we cause gradual shifts that civilization and life on Earth can adapt to—or are we igniting a wildfire that can’t be outrun?

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Top scientists warn of a ‘ghastly future of mass extinction’

The Guardian / Phoebe Weston / 13 January 2021

The planet is facing a “ghastly future of mass extinction, declining health and climate-disruption upheavals” that threaten human survival because of ignorance and inaction, according to an international group of scientists, who warn people still haven’t grasped the urgency of the biodiversity and climate crises.

The 17 experts, including Prof Paul Ehrlich from Stanford University, author of The Population Bomb, and scientists from Mexico, Australia and the US, say the planet is in a much worse state than most people – even scientists – understood.

“The scale of the threats to the biosphere and all its lifeforms – including humanity – is in fact so great that it is difficult to grasp for even well-informed experts,” they write in a report in Frontiers in Conservation Science which references more than 150 studies detailing the world’s major environmental challenges.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Clothes washing linked to ‘pervasive’ plastic pollution in Arctic

The Guardian / Damian Carrington / 12 January 2021

The Arctic is “pervasively” polluted by microplastic fibres that most likely come from the washing of synthetic clothes by people in Europe and North America, research has found.

The most comprehensive study to date found the microplastics in 96 of 97 sea water samples taken from across the polar region. More than 92% of the microplastics were fibres, and 73% of these were made of polyester and were the same width and colours as those used in clothes. Most of the samples were taken from 3-8 metres below the surface, where much marine life feeds.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

2020 was joint hottest year ever recorded

The Guardian / Damian Carrington / 8 January 2021

The climate crisis continued unabated in 2020, with the the joint highest global temperatures on record, alarming heat and record wildfires in the Arctic, and a record 29 tropical storms in the Atlantic.

Despite a 7% fall in fossil fuel burning due to coronavirus lockdowns, heat-trapping carbon dioxide continued to build up in the atmosphere, also setting a new record. The average surface temperature across the planet in 2020 was 1.25C higher than in the pre-industrial period of 1850-1900, dangerously close to the 1.5C target set by the world’s nations to avoid the worst impacts.

Only 2016 matched the heat in 2020, but that year saw a natural El Niño climate event which boosts temperatures. Without that it is likely 2020 would have been the outright hottest year. Scientists have warned that without urgent action the future for many millions of people “looks black”.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

How a famous tree scientist seeks well-being in nature during the pandemic

The Tyee / Andrew Nikiforuk / 31 December 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic will not end tomorrow. Vaccines, which will also put pressure on the virus to mutate further, will not reach the majority of the population until late summer or fall — if we are lucky. Which means we are in for more anxious months as we wait to know our collective fate.

Having had the privilege to spend time last year with the brilliant botanist Diana Beresford-Kroeger, I checked in with her and found her, as well, asking, “How do we keep well in a time of extra worry during a pandemic?”

The answer, she says, is simple: recalibrate your life, slow down and take advantage of nature’s bountiful remedies during a time of disquiet and unease. Among Beresford-Kroeger’s books are To Speak for the Trees and The Sweetness of the Simple Life. Given her intimate knowledge of trees, not surprisingly, the author and scientist seeks in their presence calm and, she says, physiological benefits.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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