Value(s) by Mark Carney – call for a new kind of economics

The Guardian / Will Hutton / 21 March 2021

In a mix of rich analysis mixed with pages that read like a dry Bank of England minute, he blames the three great crises of our times – the financial crash, the pandemic and the climate emergency (he is the UN’s special envoy on climate action and finance) – on twisted economics, an accompanying amoral culture, and degraded institutions whose lack of accountability and integrity accelerate the system’s dysfunction. Thus banks lost control of reality in a fantasy world in which balance sheets could grow exponentially without risk – another market would handle that – indulged by governments and regulators who believed that markets were always right. Then came the Covid pandemic, for which western governments were singularly unready, relying on dubious cost-benefit analysis rather than valuing what we as humans tend to – our lives and looking out for one another. The same mistake is being made with climate change.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

How grassroots schemes across UK are tackling climate crisis

The Guardian / Matthew Taylor / 10 March 2021

Communities across the UK are tackling the climate crisis with hundreds of local schemes ranging from neighbourhood heating to food co-ops, community land ownership projects and flood defences, according to a report.

A study from the IPPR thinktank found that community projects, often set up with the primary aim of reducing poverty and improving people’s day-to-day lives, were also reducing emissions and restoring nature.

Luke Murphy, the lead author of the report, said: “Under the radar there are already flourishing and transformative community initiatives to pool resources and create shared low-carbon energy, housing and natural assets … These groups have shown that they can increase community wealth and create thriving places while addressing the climate crisis.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Demand still hot for local farm boxes, say growers

CBC News / Giacomo Panico / 10 March 2021

Local growers say they’re anticipating even more demand for their products this season, as the pandemic continues to influence people’s buying and eating habits.

Mel Foster, co-owner of Foster Family Farm in the rural Ottawa community of North Gower, said people are already eager to pre-order his produce.

“We started getting calls for our 2021 season right after our 2020 season ended,” said Foster.

Like many small farms, Foster Family Farm sells community supported agriculture (CSA) boxes, which gives customers a weekly or bi-weekly shipment of freshly-picked produce.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]  [ TB Local Food Directory: CSAs ]

Land could be worth more left to nature than when farmed

The Guardian / Phoebe Weston / 8 March 2021

The economic benefits of protecting nature-rich sites such as wetlands and woodlands outweigh the profit that could be made from using the land for resource extraction, according to the largest study yet to look at the value of protecting nature at specific locations.

Scientists analysed 24 sites in six continents and found the asset returns of “ecosystem services” such as carbon storage and flood prevention created by conservation work was, pound for pound, greater than manmade capital created by using the land for activities such as forestry or farming cereals, sugar, tea or cocoa.

The study, which was led by academics at Cambridge University with the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), suggests further modifying nature for human use could be costing society more than it benefits it, but these “natural capital” costs are often not taken into account by decision-makers.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

‘Hot Money’: a dire warning on climate change, financial system

NBC News / 2 March 2021

Scientists are raising the alarm about the worsening impact of climate change, and a new documentary, “Hot Money,” is issuing a dire warning on the ripple effect that climate change could have on the financial system.

Mann: ‘Good people fall victim to doomism. I do too sometimes’

The Guardian / Jonathan Watts / 27 February 2021

The author and eminent climate scientist on the deniers’ new tactics and why positive change feels closer than it has done in 20 years

Michael E Mann is one of the world’s most influential climate scientists. He rose to prominence in 1999 as the co-author of the “hockey-stick graph”, which showed the sharp rise in global temperatures since the industrial age. This was the clearest evidence anyone had provided of the link between human emissions and global warming. This made him a target. He and other scientists have been subject to “climategate” email hacking, personal abuse and online trolling. In his new book, The New Climate War, he argues the tide may finally be turning in a hopeful direction.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Transition Towns are in the forefront of those preparing for the changes ahead. Transitioners understand that the climate-changed future is hugely unpredictable and unstable. They feel keenly the dilemma of our daily life dependence on a dominant economic system that is threatening that very life with its insistence on unending material consumption and use of fossil fuels.

— Transition Town Peterborough
TB Projects

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