Mark your calendar: 6th Annual Seedy Saturday, March 7

Transition Brockville / 31 January 2020

Cities can’t be left holding bag for recycling crisis

Montreal Gazette / Allison Hanes / 20 January 2020

For more than 25 years now, the vast majority of the recycling collected by municipalities in Canada, the United States and Europe was shipped to China. As programs adopted a “single-stream” so citizens could toss everything together without having to sort plastic, glass and paper themselves, the different materials started to contaminate each other. As our reliance on disposable containers like coffee cups and water bottles grew, we essentially off-loaded the consequences of mass consumerism on China.

But China got fed up and announced a sweeping ban on recycling imports, sending the markets for milk cartons and yogurt tubs into a nosedive, and leaving cities with mounting piles of rubbish.

That, in a nutshell, is how we got to the point where municipal programs are collapsing, companies are folding, and the stuff citizens toss in the recycling bin in good faith is ending up in the landfill.

There’s no doubt it’s a crisis. But as [Montreal mayor Valérie] Plante said, it’s also an “incredible opportunity” to remake how we deal with waste from the ground up.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

NFU report: Climate crisis is a threat, but also an opportunity

Eastern Ontario AgriNews / 09 January 2020

A new report from National Farmers Union argues that a climate-friendly food system can be designed to increase farm income.

The NFU report, Tackling the Farm Crisis and the Climate Crisis: A Transformative Strategy for Canadian Farmers and Food Systems, examines in depth the impacts of climate change on agriculture in Canada, as well as the opportunities that agriculture provides to become part of the solution.

The group says the report presents a balanced analysis that considers both the impacts of the climate crisis on agriculture and the realities of the vulnerable financial situation of farm families.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Counties adopt paved-shoulders policy

Recorder & Times / Wayne Lowrie / 24 January 2020

The United Counties of Leeds and Grenville will begin paving the shoulders of major counties roads when they are rebuilt.

The paved-shoulders policy, long advocated by cyclists and safety experts, was approved unanimously by counties council this week.

Adding a 1.5-metre paved strip on each side of a new road would add about $35,000 per kilometre to construction costs, Arup Mukherjee, public works director, told council in a report.

And although the paved shoulders would be widely used by cyclists, Mukherjee cautioned that they wouldn’t be called bike lanes.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Background paper answers key questions on 2019 flooding

IJC - ILOSLRB / 23 January 2020

In an easy-to-read background paper on High Water in 2019, the International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board responds to the call for more accessible information.

The paper uses question and answer format to explain why it flooded in 2019, why Lake Ontario outflows were not higher in 2018 and 2019, how the Board’s actions affected water levels, and what actions are being taken to reduce the risk of flooding in 2020 and beyond.

[ FULL ARTICLE ] [ BACKGROUND PAPER ]

New climate institute launches after shutdown of roundtable

CBC News / Aaron Wherry / 21 January 2020

Seven years after Stephen Harper’s Conservative government eliminated funding for the National Roundtable on the Environment and the Economy, a new institute for research and analysis on climate policy in Canada is launching with the assistance of federal funds.

The Liberal government will contribute up to $20 million over five years to provide for the new Canadian Institute for Climate Choices, which launched on Tuesday.

The institute, which is to maintain independent control over its own research and reporting, is the result of a partnership between 15 climate-focused organizations that answered a federal call for proposals in 2018.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

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