Feds unveil new COVID-19 stream for provincial infrastructure

National Post / Mia Rabson / 12 May 2020

“We have adapted our infrastructure program to the new reality of COVID,” said [Infrastructure Minister Catherine] McKenna.

It will include things like retrofitting health-care facilities and schools, particularly with a view to allowing for more physical distancing and making it easier to practise good hygiene like handwashing. Projects to help people find ways to get outside safely will also be a priority, such as new or better paths, bike lanes, and nature trails.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Gardens sprouting up as pandemic keeps us closer to home

CBC News / Hallie Cotnam / 16 May 2020

They’re sprouting up all over Ottawa this spring: raised gardens in the backyard and converted flower beds in the front, re-tooled to grow fresh produce close to home.

Urban gardening may be the new sourdough and seeds the new toilet paper as families seek to grow fresh food in the safe confines of their own property.

Social media feeds are full of garden boxes for sale. Giant cubes of soil squat in driveways, waiting for this weekend, or perhaps warmer weather.

Interest in the Edible Ottawa Gardens Group has exploded since the arrival of COVID-19, with membership blossoming from 3,000 to 4,600 in just two months, Valerie Sharp, one of the group’s administrators. She said most of them are new to gardening, many using the opportunity to spend more quality time outside with their families.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

UCDSB: Student gardening motion denied

Recorder & Times / Sabrina Bedford / 15 May 2020

A motion encouraging students to grow their own food while learning from home was denied at the public school board this week.

Upper Canada District School Board trustee John McCrea put forward a motion at this week’s board meeting to inspire students to get outside and plant vegetable gardens, citing a variety of benefits associated with gardening.

“There is a deep and profound feeling that people get when they’re outside,” McCrea said at the meeting.

“Growing something really makes you feel better.”

The motion explained that “gardening, be it in a container on a window sill or on a hectare of good land, is therapeutic, productive, measurable and available to all students.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Court reverses move by Ford government to cancel wind farm

Globe and Mail / Jeff Gray / 14 May 2020

An Ontario court has struck down a move by the provincial government to kill the partly-built Nation Rise Wind Farm southeast of Ottawa, quashing Environment Minister Jeff Yurek’s decision last year to block the project over his concerns about endangered bats.

In its ruling, the Ontario Divisional Court said Mr. Yurek’s decision last December was “not reasonable,” and did not “meet the requirements of transparency, justification, and intelligibility.” Instead of returning the matter to the minister for reconsideration, the court took the unusual step of quashing it altogether and allowing construction on the wind farm to resume.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Abattoir crisis aired at Eco Farm Day

Eastern Ontario AgriNews / Tom Van Dusen / 5 March 2020

With this year’s theme “On Common Ground: Food and Farming in a Shifting Climate,” the event previously dedicated primarily to organic growing for niche farmers has widened its scope by looking at the increasing impact of climate change, the farm income crisis, and the loss of farmland. The 2020 event unrolled on Feb. 22 and 23 in Cornwall.

“When we recognize that we face common struggles, we find support and solutions in one another,” the organizing team stated, inviting participants in the 2020 conference to spend time learning from, and connecting with, each other while acting collectively to “co-create regenerative and resilient food and farming systems.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Where are all the carbon emissions coming from?

Grist / Shannon Osaka / 27 April 2020

Pedestrians have taken over city streets, people have almost entirely stopped flying, skies are blue (even in Los Angeles!) for the first time in decades, and global CO2 emissions are on-track to drop by … about 5.5 percent.

Wait, what? Even with the global economy at a near-standstill, the best analysis suggests that the world is still on track to release 95 percent of the carbon dioxide emitted in a typical year, continuing to heat up the planet and driving climate change even as we’re stuck at home.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

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