Transition Brockville archive

Category : News (569)

Community hubs a vital asset in the face of climate change

NOW Magazine / 13 October 2020

There are eight officially-designated Hubs in Toronto – and many other community organizations that function as hubs, from Rexdale in the west to Scarborough in the east. Many hubs are located in neighbourhoods facing high rates of poverty and marginalization. Typically run by a local non-profit agency, community hubs offer services such as health care, newcomer support for immigrants, senior and youth programming, and employment assistance. These hubs offer valuable resources for seeding local, climate-related projects such as staff support and convening space (in-person or virtual) for residents to develop their ideas and initiatives.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

More than half Canadians grew their own food at home this year

National Post / Laura Brehaut / 7 October 2020

The spring rush on garden centres and seed sellers wasn’t a false alarm. COVID-19 has driven Canadians to get their hands in the dirt in a major way. Just over half (51 per cent) grow at least one type of fruit or vegetable, according to a new report from Dalhousie University’s Agri-Food Analytics Lab (AAL) examining home food gardening in response to the pandemic. And of those, nearly one in five (17.4 per cent) started growing their own food for the first time during COVID-19.

“Pandemic gardening is definitely a thing,” says AAL research associate Lisa Mullins, laughing. “(Lockdown) led a lot of people to look at their physical surroundings and say, ‘OK. What can I do to add a little joy to my life — to broaden my interests?’”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Community garden updates

Transition Brockville / 29 September 2020

Despite a slow start with the arrival of COVID-19 last spring, community gardens did get up and running — following guidelines established by the City of Brockville and our local health unit.

The Butler’s Creek Community Garden on North Augusta Road includes 22 householder plots, a shared herb garden, shared raspberry, black currant, rhubarb and horseradish patches, and a pollinating flower garden. A compost system is working really well, providing plenty of composted organic matter for the gardens. All were encouraged to donate surpluses to Loaves and Fishes, the Brockville and Area Food Bank or the Food Cupboard run by the Baptist Church. There are three plots still available for the 2021 season. Contact garden coordinator Nancy Raitt at nancyraitt@corptype.ca

[ more… ]

Ontario funding model undermines transit, favours Uber

The Energy Mix / 07 September 2020

As Ontario’s Doug Ford government signals an ever-increasing enthusiasm for microtransit services like Uber, critics warn that, far from being a panacea for transit woes, ridesharing undermines public transit and leads to reduced accessibility, rising fares, and more congestion and emissions.

And the federal government isn’t helping matters, they add, with plans to tie a C$1.8-billion bailout for the country’s pandemic-devastated transit systems to a requirement that provinces kick in an equal amount.

The 50/50 breakdown for the transit funds has “led to several calamitous outcomes,” freelance reporter James Wilt reports on Passage. The government of New Brunswick, for example, simply turned down the funding, allowing systems like Saint John Transit to remain underserviced. But more “insidious” still is the Ontario government’s decision to place even more conditions on releasing the combined funds to municipalities, ordering them to “review the lowest performing bus routes and consider whether they may be better serviced by microtransit”.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The climate case for building 15-minute neighbourhoods

Ecology Ottawa / Accessed 06 September 2020

The links between urban sprawl and climate change are well-documented in cities and regions around the world, but are perhaps best encapsulated for Ottawa’s context by former Environmental Commissioner of Ontario Dr. Dianne Saxe. Dr. Saxe has called urban sprawl “Ontario’s oil sands” – it’s the province’s main driver of greenhouse gas emissions, has a wide array of other environmental costs, and is bound up with a complex web of political and financial interests that benefit from the status quo.

More sprawl means people must travel further – often by car – to get to jobs and basic amenities. It also typically means more carbon-intensive housing patterns, with energy inefficient single-detached homes dominating instead of more compact forms. In Ontario (the Toronto area is shown below), there’s a clear link between climate pollution and urban form – with dense, walkable communities seeing the lowest levels of emissions.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

From feast to famine

Queen's Alumni Review / Andrew Stokes / 2020 Issue #3

This past February, Paul Sawtell (Artsci’02) offered me a tour of the low-slung warehouse in North York that holds his business, 100km Foods. As we walked, he talked about the pride he felt moving into the space. How when he started the enterprise with his wife, Grace Mandarano, he couldn’t have dreamed of being big enough to need its more than 8,000 square feet.

Back in 2008, they’d started 100km Foods to link the farms of the Ontario Greenbelt to the restaurants and stores that wanted local seasonal food. Now, after 12 years of growth in fits and starts, they were on strong footing. They had hundreds of clients, a staff of over two dozen, and had just been awarded a “Best for the World” designation by B Corp.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

«page 1 of 95

The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
TB Projects

Subscribe to our Blog

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Subscribe to our Newsletter
Subscribe to our monthly newsletter for local, provincial and national news highlights along with Big Picture articles, tips on what you can do, and an area events calendar.

Biodiversity of the 1000 Islands
Follow Us on Facebook