Transition Brockville archive

Category : How To (503)

Drought busting #3

The Edible Garden / Edythe Falconer / August 2017

As in all aspects of gardening, we augment the resilience of our plants – come what may – by building and maintaining the best possible soil – well-structured and well fed with regular dosages of organic matter.

It has been said, for example, that up to 75% of plant moisture needs can be met if soil has good structure with the capacity to retain both moisture and nutrients.

What is well known but worth repeating is that the application of organic mulches has a huge impact on plant ability to withstand temperature extremes. Mulching keeps down weeds, killing the competition – and eventually mulch breaks down to become the building material for more of the soil aggregates needed by resilient soils. Also worth mentioning is that mulch helps prevent evaporation and assists in water absorption when you do water or it rains. Organic amendments are also essential for healthy populations of soil microorganisms. These tiny creatures break down organic matter to make nutrients more available to plants.

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8 huge benefits of living in a Tiny House

Mother Earth News / Jennifer Poindexter / 02 February 2017

Tiny houses are everywhere! These tiny, compact, affordable houses are the perfect addition to any family. Just look up Tiny House Hunters, Tiny House Builders, or Tiny House Nation. The blogs and TV shows show how popular the craze is right now, especially with the cost of owning a “normal house” growing out of proportion. But, besides the cost effectiveness of owning and living in a tiny house, there are tons of benefits. Ability to travel, eco-friendly living, less money decorating and cleaning, to just name a few. Together, we will go over the top 10 benefits of living in a tiny house, and hey, you might even want to start considering one.

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Why you should turn your yard into a mini-farm

Yes! Magazine / Jennifer Luxton, Erin Sagen / 26 July 2017

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Cut and come again edibles

The Edible Garden / Edythe Falconer / July 2017

If we want to get the best out of our plants harvesting them a bit at a time is a good idea and doesn’t leave gaps in rows of healthy homegrown goodies. There are several plants that lend themselves readily to this procedure.

Even those of us who don’t grow rhubarb will know that this plant will keep on regenerating throughout the growing season. You in turn as the prospective cook will always have fresh stems near at hand. Top dressing around the plant once or twice per year will ensure good production over time.

There are other plants that are similarly obliging and at least two of them belong to the cabbage family. These are broccoli and broccolini. In the case of broccoli once the main stem has been harvested the plant will keep on producing smaller heads that are just as tasty as the larger first one.

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For some millennials, minimalism is the path to happiness

Globe & Mail / Brenda Bouw / 06 July 2017

Minimalism is striking a chord among millennials, many of who have grown up watching their parents work hard to buy stuff that isn’t making them happy, says Ryan Nicodemus, 35, the author, speaker, podcaster and filmmaker – along with childhood friend Joshua Fields Millburn – behind The Minimalists.

While millennials are sometimes stereotyped as being lazy and self-absorbed, many are simply rejecting societal norms around work and consumerism. Mr. Nicodemus says consumers have been sold “the American dream,” through advertising – that they’ll be happier with the right car, clothes and gadgets.

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Invest in the highest value asset: Personal skills

The Daily Bell / Joe Jarvis / 16 June 2017

That’s what this world needs: skills. Raw resources are useless without the skill to properly apply them.

There are skills for financial gain, skills for personal gain, and skills for a backup plan. Most of them overlap; something once a hobby can become a career, for instance becoming a tennis instructor. Or a skill that is a “backup plan” can become the bread and butter in an emergency, like keeping bees or growing a garden.

Tangible assets are a needed hedge when it seems everything–the stock market, real estate, bonds–are overvalued or in a bubble. A good useful skill is as tangible an asset as they get. And unlike resources, a skill cannot so easily be taken from you.

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

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