Transition Brockville archive

Category : How To (504)

The economic case for retrofitting buildings

Globe & Mail / Toon Dreessen / 17 February 2017

A study of Bentall Kennedy’s North American real estate portfolio of more than 300 buildings found that environmentally friendly office properties net 3.7 per cent higher rents. In their Canadian holdings, occupancy rates in environmentally certified buildings were 18.7 per cent higher than non-certified.

The study, conducted by University of Guelph professor Avis Devine and co-author Nils Kok of Maastricht University in The Netherlands, calls tenants in green buildings “stickier” and “happier.” Tenants stay put in their space, she says, and reduce landlord leasing costs associated with turnover.

Plus, as governments move to increase the costs of carbon, which have now been benchmarked at $50 per tonne by 2022, there will be a strong incentive for building owners to reduce operational costs related to emissions and energy use.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

What about the kids? Conversations on parenting in dark times

Common Dreams / Elizabeth West / 07 May 2017

It is entirely possible that things will unfold in a manner none of us can foresee and if that happens, then we will have to be nimble and respond accordingly. No guarantees, no promises. We are in uncharted waters and not only is there no easy answer for the collective, but we must all find our own way, both in this limbo time, when for many of us, things continue pretty much as before, and in the years ahead, as the status quo collapses.

This time becomes exponentially more difficult for those who have children and grandchildren, those who love individual kids and hold them close in their lives. It is one thing to contemplate the breakdown of natural and social structures known throughout our lives, to allow oneself to consider—and to grieve—the destruction of so much of the planet and those, human and not, who have made it their home. It is another thing altogether to feel into the suffering, the loss and the violation of hopes and dreams that likely await many children, those who have yet to really begin to live their lives.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Voluntary simplicity: Resources

Transition Brockville / 05 May 2017

Here are resources — websites, books and videos — mentioned by TB Steering Committee member Christine Stesky in her presentation and discussion on voluntary simplicity on Sunday, April 23.

  • The Simplicity Collective

    Voluntary simplicity, or simple living, is a way of life that rejects the high-consumption, materialistic lifestyles of consumer cultures and affirms what is often just called ‘the simple life’ or ‘downshifting.’ The rejection of consumerism arises from the recognition that ordinary Western-style consumption habits are degrading the planet; that lives of high consumption are unethical in a world of great human need; and that the meaning of life does not and cannot consist in the consumption or accumulation of material things.

  • [ more… ]

Study: Believe you can stop climate change and you will

phys.org / University of Warwick / 04 May 2017

“Often climate change messages try to persuade the public by increasing belief that climate change is real, or through fear of its dire consequences. But mere belief in climate change is not enough, and fear can backfire if we feel helpless and overwhelmed.

“It is vitally important that individuals appreciate the impact and value of their own actions for us to make a meaningful change as a whole.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

How to dehydrate fresh spinach

Mother Earth News / Tammy Taylor, Taylor-Made Homestead / 20 May 2016

It seems spinach is almost a feast-or-famine kind of vegetable — it’s gloriously prolific when it grows, then BOOM! Gone for the season. So, I’m harvesting as much spinach as I can by cutting the leaves to the bottom inch or so of the plant which allows the spinach plant to regrow it’s green leafy goodness for yet another harvest.

But fresh spinach is so perishable and we can only eat so much fresh spinach. I wanted to preserve this spring goodness to enjoy later in the year, so I decided to dehydrate it.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Confessions of a community garden coordinator

Permaculture Research Institute / Rebecca McCarty / 18 April 2017

Since it is now April, and because spring is (finally!) officially upon us up here in Minnesota in the United States, we’re about to start the next growing season in the community garden that I help to plan and coordinate for. For me, the garden absolutely comes with some excitement of yet another opportunity to grow our own food, to build community, and to get outside and spend some time in nature after being cooped up indoors all winter long.

However, it also comes with many of the responsibilities of management in the human realm. This is a level of management that I hadn’t really fully contemplated when I first got involved with the garden. I don’t really regret my involvement with the garden by any means, but there are many things that I’ve learned so far through my experience as a founding member of a community garden planning and coordinating team since it was established five years ago.

I would like to share just a few of the things that I have learned along the way in community garden planning and coordinating. I hope that by sharing my experiences about the community garden that I am involved with, it will help you if you are considering starting a community garden yourself.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
TB Projects

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