Transition Brockville archive

Category : How To (419)

12 ways to stop wasting money and take control of your stuff

TIME / Kit Yarrow / 20 November 214

In my work as a consumer psychologist and author, I’ve read countless studies about consumer behavior, and I’ve conducted plenty of research on my own, interviewing hundreds of shoppers about how, when, and why they shop.

Here’s what I’ve learned about how to avoid piling up too much stuff and how to stop making unnecessary, excessive, and ultimately unsatisfying purchases.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Save money by drying fruits and vegetables at home

Mother Earth News / Lorna Peterson / July/August 1977

Dehydration as a method of food preservation has been around a long time. Primitive man dried victuals by the heat of the sun or with the aid of fire, then ground the dehydrated stores into a long-lasting powder or ate them “as is”. Now, thousands of years later, dehydration is still one of the most widely used methods of food preservation in the world . . . for some mighty good reasons.

  1. Drying preserves the vitamin, mineral, protein, and fiber content of foods . . . more so than preservation techniques that expose the viands to great changes in temperature.
  2. Dehydrated foodstuffs are actually more flavorful — in most cases — than the original, undried food. (Frozen and canned edibles, on the other hand, are — if anything — less tasty than their fresh or dried equivalents.)
  3. It costs little or nothing to dry foods, whereas freezing and canning both require a potentially large initial investment in equipment.
  4. Dried goods can be stored in a smaller space than either frozen, canned, or fresh foods. (Twenty pounds of tomatoes, for instance, will — when canned — fill eleven one-quart jars. The same quantity of tomatoes dried weighs a little more than a pound and occupies a single No. 10 can.)
  5. Dried foods — when kept dry — remain edible virtually forever.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Avoiding plastic when grocery shopping

Mother Earth News / Chantal Plamondon, Jay Sinha / May 2018

Ten years ago, in our local grocery store in Wakefield, Quebec, you would rarely see someone bring their own reusable bags. Now you rarely see someone NOT bringing reusable bags. It took some time, but the new habit has started to take hold and what was once perceived as normal behavior has completely reversed. The same applies to many other little habits you might want to start integrating into your daily routine. It’s the example that you set for others that creates change in your community and beyond.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Updated Ontario Cycling Skills guide

Active Brockville / 03 May 2018

MTO recently completed a major update and republished the Ontario Cycling Skills guide. It now provides a complete and current summary of how to ride and operate a bike and how to safely navigate Ontario’s roads.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Homemade fertilizer from vegetable scraps

Mother Earth News / Kathleen Cabeceiras / April/May 2016

We’re big fruit and vegetable eaters, so we have lots of rinds and peelings to dispose of. Those, along with coffee grounds, tea leaves and egg shells, really add up to a lot of potential compost.

I bought an inexpensive food blender, which I keep under the kitchen sink when not in use. Every day, I grind up all the peelings, grounds and shells with some water, and then I pour the mixture around my rhododendrons, azaleas and other shrubs. If we have any banana peels, I grind those up with some water and pour the mixture around my roses. Roses seem to love bananas! These “produce smoothies” really are good fertilizer; you should see my rhododendrons in bloom!

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Every house should be designed for multigenerational living

Mother Nature Network / Lloyd Alter / 02 May 2018

In many cultures, multi-generational households are pretty standard; your parents took care of you, and now you take care of them. In China, almost every apartment sold has three bedrooms: one for the parents, one for the kid, and one for grandma.

But in the United States, Canada and many European countries, the natural progression has been to get a job or get married and move out to set up your own household. And from the end of World War II to the low point around 1980, that was pretty much what happened.

However as of late, particularly since the Great Recession, the number of multigenerational households has increased dramatically. According to Pew Research in a recently updated study, the numbers are way up — 20 percent of the population, 64 million Americans.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

The Transition Towns movement aims toward veering away from excessive consumption – to deal with the conjoined problems of peak oil and climate change – but also in the belief that we may create an essentially more contented society, through building strong and resilient local communities. We will get to know our neighbours better, because we shall all need one another in the time to come.

— Chris Rhodes, Resource Insights (03 June 2013)
TB Projects

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