Transition Brockville archive

Category : How To (382)

Best flowers to plant with vegetables

Mother Earth News / Rosalind Creasy / February/March 2015

It turns out that flowers are an essential ingredient in establishing a healthy garden because they attract beneficial insects and birds, which control pests and pollinate crops. Most gardeners understand this on some level. They may even know that pollen and nectar are food for insects, and that seed heads provide food for birds. What some may not realize is just how many of our wild meadows and native plants have disappeared under acres of lawn, inedible shrubs and industrial agriculture’s fields of monocultures, leaving fewer food sources for beneficial critters. With bees and other pollinators under a chemical siege these days and their populations in drastic decline, offering chemical-free food sources and safe havens is crucial. Plus, giving beneficial insects supplemental food sources of pollen and nectar throughout the season means they’ll stick around for when pests show up.

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First steps toward building a local regeneration movement

Organic Consumers Association / 9 October 2017

The paradigm shift from degenerative food, farming and land-use practices toward regenerative practices—those that regenerate soil, biodiversity, health, local economies and climate stability—is arguably the most critical transformation occurring throughout the world today.

Regeneration practices, scaled up globally on billions of acres of farmland, pasture and forest, have the potential to not only mitigate, but also to reverse global warming. At the same time, these practices provide solutions to other burning issues such as poverty, deteriorating public health, environmental degradation and global conflict.

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Off-grid food preservation methods

Mother Earth News / Leda Meredith / June/July 2016

Before widespread refrigeration and electricity, people developed other food-preservation methods to slow down spoilage. Adopting some of these long-established ways to preserve food and relying less on modern ones will reduce your carbon footprint; increase your self-reliance; and cost less than canning, freezing, and other grid-dependent ways to preserve food.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Seed viability: Waste not, want not

The Edible Garden / Dale Odorizzi / January 2018

This is an exciting time in a gardener’s life. The hustle and bustle of Christmas has passed. I can finally sit down and leisurely leaf through the seed catalogues that have arrived in my mail box over the past month. It is the time when my garden looks its best, at least in my mind. I dream about the beautiful new flowers I can grow or how neat and weed free my vegetable garden will look. As I look through my seed catalogues, I am struck with the thought that last year I bought a pack of cucumber seeds and of the 100 seeds in the pack, I only used 12. I still have over half a pack of bean and pea seeds left.

Can I use them? Should I run the risk of using seeds that may not produce, or should I just order a bunch more. There are various simple tests for viability.

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Urban Forestry Toolkit

Green Infrastructure Ontario Coalition

GIO’s urban forestry toolkit is a set of documents that support those working to improve urban forest management across the province. This toolkit builds upon our 2015 report Ontario’s Urban Forests: Call to Action and was developed with input from professionals around the province.

The first piece of the toolkit can help build the case for the value that urban forests provide as a municipal asset – with the goal of integrating urban forest management into municipal asset management plans. Read the bulletin on communicating the benefits of the urban forest in a municipal context HERE.

The second document in our toolkit helps urban forest managers understand how urban forest assets fit into the municipal asset management planning process. Read the urban forest asset managment primer HERE.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Greening your holiday

Green Communities Canada / GCNews / December 2017

Our member organizations have oodles of suggestions for greening your holiday.

If you are hosting a party, GreenUP, Peterborough, ON, suggests ways to decorate with nature, reduce food waste, save energy, and otherwise green your event.

EcoSuperior, Thunder Bay, ON, shares the top five ways to reduce holiday waste.

Green Calgary has great gift ideas that are unique and practical – like a clothes drying rack. Stainless steel straws, soap nuts, and the Green Calgary Recipe Book are other possibilities.

The December newsletter of Rideau Environmental Action League, Smiths Falls, ON, offers helpful advice on regifting, including advice on when it’s acceptable to regift a used item.

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The Transition Framework

Transition initiatives share many of the same goals as other groups, and work collaboratively with a variety of organizations in their local areas. Transition differs in that it focuses specifically on preparing communities for the changes associated with unprecedented resource depletion and transitioning away from fossil-fuel dependency.

— Transition U.S.
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