Transition Brockville archive

Category : How To (407)

Emergency preparedness movement has gone mainstream

Globe and Mail / Dave McGinn / 20 April 2018

Preparing to be self-sufficient in the event of a natural disaster or some other emergency may have once been seen as the sole obsession of people who believe the end is nigh. But prepping, as it is known among devotees, has gone mainstream. Costco now sells a range of emergency gear, including survival kits containing high-calorie food bars, a hand-crank flashlight, waterproof matches, a whistle, first aid kit and a pocket knife, among other items, as well as a one-year supply of food for four people that costs $8,499.99. Prepper meet-up events have seen attendance spike in recent years, and an increasing number of people are seeking out information on prepper blogs – the Canadian Preppers Network blog, for example, receives more than 20,000 visitors each month.

At its most basic, prepping is having the necessities on hand to survive for a brief period of time, usually about three days, without outside assistance.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Beef, lamb, lobster or fish?

University of Tasmania / 04 April 2018

A new study by a team of Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) and Canadian scientists has found that catching most types of fish produces far less carbon per kilo of protein than land-based alternatives such as beef or lamb.

The researchers undertaking the study found that fisheries for small pelagic species such as anchovies and sardines emit a fraction of the carbon generated by red meat production.

On average, global fisheries have a low-carbon footprint similar to that of poultry.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Rain barrels available for purchase

Transition Brockville / 16 April 2018

Transition Brockville was selling rain barrels from repurposed food-grade barrels until a couple of years ago when our sources “dried up”. The Volunteer Centre is offering barrels this spring.

This sale benefits the Volunteer Centre of St. Lawrence-Rideau and will be held at 105 Strowger Blvd, Brockville on Friday, May 18, 2018 from 3:00 PM to 6:00 PM. To see various barrel styles and to order, visit http://rainbarrel.ca/leedsgrenville. For product-specific questions, contact info@RainBarrelFundraising.com.

[ PREORDER WEBSITE ]

The id and the eco

AEON / Rosemary Randall / 05 December 2012

When I was young, I was told that there were a number of topics I shouldn’t talk about at dinner parties: politics, religion, sex, money and death usually featured on the list. Today we might add climate change. Like politics or religion, the subject can lead to conflict or controversy. Like sex or money, it can cause embarrassment. Most importantly, like death, it can raise fears and anxieties that people feel have no place in polite conversation.

Climate change is a disturbing subject that casts a shadow across ordinary life. I recall an encounter with a woman called Sandra at a community project I was running. As we completed a questionnaire to calculate her individual carbon footprint, she pushed her coffee cup awkwardly away and said: ‘I hate all that advice about “Don’t overfill the kettle, turn your thermostat down, unplug your phone charger.” I try to follow it but, every time I do one of those things, it makes me think about climate change and I feel hopeless, upset. So then I don’t bother. Why make yourself feel bad when there isn’t really anything you can do?’ Sandra expressed openly what most people don’t admit — thinking about climate change is upsetting and brings to the surface an internal conflict about how to respond.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

New garden book club

Cosies British Café, Well Grounded Gardens

This is for both the garden and book enthusiast to share an afternoon of conversation and ideas about garden books and gardening while enjoying a cosy refreshing break with friends.

If you are interested in joining us, contact wellgroundedgardens@gmail.com or 613-498-4475 for more information and to register for the first session Tuesday, April 24 at 2 p.m. Space is limited so be an early book worm.

Why we make our own maple syrup

Mother Earth News / Rebecca Harrold / 29 March 2018

Finally, after years of talking about it, we tapped some sugar maple trees and boiled down the sap to make maple syrup. The syrup we produced is rich in maple flavour and tastes all the more delicious because we produced it ourselves.

Our home is in Southern Ontario, in the heart of the sugar maple’s (Acer saccharum) range. Around here, real maple syrup is easy to find at farmers markets, at farmgate sales on Mennonite farms or at any Maple Syrup Festival. Despite its easy availability, we wanted to try our hand at making it ourselves. It would be one more check mark on our list of Self-sufficiency To Dos.

We tried. We succeeded (with lots of room for improvement). And we’re doing it again next year. While not labour intensive, it does take time and effort to produce a batch of maple syrup. But for us, all that time and effort are worthwhile. Real maple syrup, in addition to being delicious, really is a better option than refined sugars and even some natural sugars.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

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