Transition Brockville archive

Category : How To (459)

How to make natural cleaners

Mother Earth News / Alice Alvrez / February 2018

Keeping your home clean can actually be a pretty toxic experience if you use the typical chemical concoctions that are sold as cleaners these days.

Ingredients like ammonia and bleach are extremely harsh, and the fumes linger in your home long after you’ve done your cleaning. Many less pronounceable substances are mixed in for good measure (like maybe some dimethyl ethylbenzyl ammonium chloride or trisodium nitrilotriacetate), even though many have been linked to increased cancer rates. Not only do they affect the air quality in your home, these substances end up in the water supply. You can imagine what that will do to the environment.

All you really need around the house is vinegar, baking soda and salt. You can get vinegar at the grocery store in large jugs, and a bulk store should carry baking soda and salt in larger quantities. These three natural ingredients can create a variety of cleaning products that will keep your home clean without the noxious mess.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Emergency survival kits

Mother Earth News / Matthew Stein / December 2010/January 2011

In today’s world of blackouts, big storms, terror alerts and global warming, many of us will experience significant disruptions in the flow of electricity or goods at some point in our lives. Having an emergency survival kit can be a big comfort and aid — maybe even a lifesaver — in such a situation. Stocking up on a few supplies, learning new skills and making an emergency contingency plan don’t have to take a lot of time or money, and these steps will foster peace of mind in turbulent times.

You can’t plan for all possible scenarios, but a wise person plans for the most likely possibilities and stores at least a few basic supplies for emergencies. The tips here will help you evaluate your needs and goals, and plan for short-term emergency situations (72 hours to one week).

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Leafy ambitions for fall’s bounty

Trowel Talk / Pat Stachon / September 2019

Autumn is such a beautiful time of year in Eastern Canada that people travel to this area just to enjoy the wonderful sight. As the leaves begin to turn, their colours vary every year depending on our previous summer weather. They can also vary widely from tree to tree and even branch to branch.

Leaves begin to fall any time from the end of August and by November we usually wonder what is to be done with them all?

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

9 Permaculture practices

Mother Earth News / Jessi Bloom / June/July 2017

We’re all stewards of the land, blessed to be living here, and it’s our critical responsibility to make sure we honor the natural resources that help us live. Permaculture design provides a great toolkit for doing this, and it can also help simplify your life and make your landscape more resilient. Practicing permaculture can be fun and rewarding on many levels.

Though it’s complex and can take years to learn, I’m going to help simplify permaculture for you. First and foremost, permaculture is rooted in ethics, which can act as a filter to help you make decisions:

  • Take care of the Earth.
  • Take care of people — starting with yourself!
  • Share resources and abundance.

You can learn from a number of different ecological design principles, creation techniques, and even technical jargon, but I’ll let you save all that for your own adventures in learning permaculture. Here, I’ll focus on some easy ways to get started on your journey.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Guide to urban homesteading

Mother Earth News / Rachel Kaplan / April/May 2014

If you live in a city and dream of someday being able to work the land and become a modern homesteader, consider this: There’s no need to wait — you can easily do many homesteading activities in the city. You may not have enough garden space to grow your own wheat or corn, but you can harvest an amazing amount of many crops from a collection of containers. Owning your own milk cow is likely not an option, but keeping backyard chickens certainly is. Plus, in the city, it can be much easier to build a community of like-minded neighbors who can share tools, knowledge and friendship.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Give your yard back to nature

Popular Mechanics / Jessie Kissinger / 01 July 2019

Most American yards don’t reflect their ecological condition. The plants need to be treated with fertilizer because the soil’s not right. They want water the weather doesn’t provide. Wildlife disappears because they no longer have food to eat. All this creates more labor for homeowners, the humans in this ecosystem, because they’re working against nature instead of with it.

“A garden that’s planted purely by aesthetic decisions is like a car with no engine,” says Larry Weaner, founder and principal of Larry Weaner Landscape Associates in Glenside, Pennsylvania. “It may look beautiful, the stereo works great, but you’re going to have to push it up the hill.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

«page 1 of 77

The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

Subscribe to our Blog

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Subscribe to our Newsletter
Subscribe to our monthly newsletter for local, provincial and national news highlights along with Big Picture articles, tips on what you can do, and an area events calendar