Transition Brockville archive

Category : How To (388)

Companion planting with vegetables and flowers

Mother Earth News / Barbara Pleasant / April/May 2011

The idea of “companion planting” has been around for thousands of years, during which time it has become so besmirched with bad science and metaphysics that many gardeners aren’t sure what it means. The current definition goes something like this: Companion planting is the establishment of two or more species in close proximity so that some cultural benefit, such as pest control or increased yield, may be achieved.

Historically, North American and European gardeners have based many of their attempts with companion planting on widely published charts, which were mostly derived from funky chemistry experiments using plant extracts in the 1930s. But it turns out many of the plant partnerships listed in these “traditional” companion-planting charts don’t actually work well. Reaping the benefits of companion planting is possible, though, as long as you look to time-tested crop combinations.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Are pickles fermented? Pickled vs. fermented foods

Mother Earth News / Chelsea Clark / 11 May 2015

Since I discovered the various health benefits of fermented foods, I have become a complete fan of these sour, delicious treats. I have learned to make my own fermented vegetables, sauerkraut, sourdough bread, and more. But when it comes to grabbing a fermented snack from the grocery store, choosing the right product can be confusing. So what are fermented foods, exactly? And are pickles fermented, or are pickled foods different from fermented foods? These types of questions shouldn’t be ignored; there is a crucial difference between pickled and fermented foods that impacts their nutritive value.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Some choices matter: Eastern Ontario

Credit Unions of Ontario / 26 September 2017

Home to our nation’s capital, Eastern Ontario is chock full of people looking to make positive change happen in their communities, their province and across the country. Discover how credit unions are supporting this change, and sparking a new wave of progressive ideas from Kingston to Ottawa.

Mark’s ten seedling tips

West Coast Seeds / Mark Macdonald / 22 February 2017

You’ve selected your seeds, you’ve invested in unfamiliar seed starting equipment, you’ve planted the seeds — and now the damn things are coming up! What to do?!

Lesson One: Take it easy. Remember that seeds are just like any other embryo, and that their parents have bestowed upon them a supply of food to get them started. As seeds germinate, they use this food to unfurl their first leaf/leaves, and to pop out a tiny, rudimentary root with which to take in water and nutrients. As those first leaves unfurl, the plants will begin taking energy from the sun through photosynthesis. My approach is to lay off all fertilizers until it’s time to transplant them into their permanent growing spots. Seedlings just don’t need a lot of food. They need bright light and a steady, but moderate supply of water.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Garden planning for food preservation

Mother Earth News / Deborah Niemann / February/March 2016

Our vegetable gardens offer us beautiful, fresh bounty during the growing season — and they also have the potential to increase our food security the rest of the year. When you craft a plan to put up some of the crops you grow, you’re preparing for the future, simplifying winter meals, reducing waste, and saving money, too.

As you plan your garden with preservation in mind, consider what your family loves to eat versus what they merely tolerate. Talk with your household members about what you want your meals to look like for the following year. If you’re aiming for year-round veggie self-sufficiency, calculate how many times per week on average your family eats a particular crop, and multiply that figure by 52 (number of weeks in a year). Then, use our chart of crop yields in Garden Planning: Guidelines for Growing Vegetables to arrive at a rough calculation of how much of that crop to plant. Or, to start smaller, jump in with any of the following ideas, organized from the easiest to grow and preserve to the crops and storage methods that require more expertise or a longer-term commitment.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The Essential Guide to Doing Transition

Transition Network / 28 September 2016

We now have 10 years’ experience of supporting groups bringing Transition to life in over 50 countries, in towns, cities, villages, institutions. We have a pretty clear idea now of what works and what doesn’t, and we want to share that with you so you can be as effective as possible as quickly as possible.

We have created a lot of resources to support groups doing and being, Transition. In this Beginner’s Guide we will signpost you to everything you will need as you begin the journey to doing some extraordinary things where you live. Think of this as your Transition Starter Pack.

[ DOWNLOAD ]

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The Transition Framework

Inner Transition is occasionally overlooked in favour of more immediately ‘practical’ undertakings, reinforcing an observed and acknowledged division in many Transition Initiatives between “doers” and “talkers”, but for Transition Initiatives looking to foster a kind of community resilience that is equitable, inclusive, nimble, responsive, caring, and cohesive, Inner Transition efforts are a necessary place to start.

— Anne Rucchetto, Blake Poland
TB Projects

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