Transition Brockville archive

Category : How To (481)

Cheap, simple DIY water catchment and irrigation

resilience.org / Kara Stiff / 8 July 2020

Last year in foothills North Carolina, we had a hundred-year flood in June. Then we went three months without any rain at all. Some things produced well in spite of drought, but tomatoes really suffered and I hardly got any pumpkins. I was not able to keep things adequately watered by hand even before my catchment tank ran dry.

I know that the carbon footprint of tap water is pretty small compared to, say, tropical vacations. But I still have a philosophical problem with paying to have water cleaned so thoroughly that it’s drinkable, and then pumped for miles and miles, only to pour it on the ground. I like the idea of living within the rain budget of my area, which isn’t too hard because we usually get too much. I like the idea of having irrigation water even if I lost access to my local water utility for some reason (power outage, income outage, anything).

Most of all, I like the idea of my garden looking all big and lush like my mom’s. She waters constantly.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Home canning cardinal rules for first-time food preservers

Mother Earth News / Mary Moss-Sprague / 9 April 2020

Our lives may have been turned topsy-turvy with the global health pandemic, but the can-do spirit of many people is very much alive and well. Many are turning to nature both for comfort and sustenance. That’s a very good thing, especially when it comes to growing and preserving our own food.

As a trained and certified Master Food Preserver, one of my main concerns about food preservation is that of food safety. It doesn’t do any good to go through the process of canning or otherwise preserving foods if it is done incorrectly and unsafely. If you’re an old hand at canning, you know how important it is to adhere to processing procedures and times, good for you! If, however, you’re new to this time-honored skill, keep in mind that established recipes and procedures exist for a reason.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Giving the green thumbs up to community gardens in LG&L

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit / Press Release / 1 May 2020

Residents in Leeds, Grenville and Lanark will be able to start planting in community gardens soon. On April 25, 2020 the government of Ontario lifted restrictions, allowing community gardens to operate following the guidance of the local Medical Officer of Health. Dr. Paula Stewart, Medical Officer of Health for the Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit supports Ontario’s decision. ”Community gardens increase access to healthy foods, provide a sense of community belonging, and support mental well-being, and physical activity”.

Under the provincial Emergency Order, only gardens with the capacity to follow the requirements are permitted to operate.The Health Unit has prepared safe operating requirements for local municipalities, community organizations related to: entrance restrictions, physical distancing, hand hygiene, sharing and cleaning of equipment, signage, and communication.

In addition, rules and guidelines for community gardeners have been developed and should be followed by all users.

[ FULL PRESS RELEASE ]

7 ways to build resilience at home

Treehugger / Katherine Martinko / 30 April 2020

The coronavirus pandemic has made people realize how dependent they are on the outside world for services, resources, and entertainment. Weeks of self-isolation have left many feeling vulnerable, scared, and bored. In the months and years that follow this pandemic, I suspect that more people will be wanting to build up their resilience at home. They won’t become outright preppers, who anticipate worst-case scenarios at every turn (and do have some worthwhile takeaway points for the rest of us), but they won’t want to feel so blindsided and exposed to disaster ever again.

I came across an article by Trent Hamm for The Simple Dollar blog, where he lists “12 frugal ways to become more self-sufficient.” This is exactly what I’m talking about, and I’d like to highlight a few of his points, and share some of mine. Self-sufficiency, or resilience, is always a smart goal to pursue, and it doesn’t have to be all or nothing; even a partial achievement can make a big difference. If you’re not already doing some or all of these things, you can start today.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Educating children in the spirit of simple living

Mother Earth News / Anna Twitto / 9 November 2017

I see many parents driven by the famous “Mom, I’m bored!” especially during summer vacations – so much that they feel compelled to entertain their children 24/7. As soon as the child says he or she is bored, they will be immediately taken to the mall, the zoo, the swimming pool, or signed up to any number of extra-curricular activities.

Boredom, while often seen as unproductive, can in fact be of infinite use. A bored mind is a clear, unoccupied mind, which can, when provided with the right tools, produce great things. Inventions, books, scrapbooks, crafts, paintings, new recipes, creative role-playing games, and even various household projects have been known to grow out of a seemingly nonconstructive, “bored” state of mind.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Gardening guru explains how to regrow veggies from scraps

CBC News / Madeleine Cummings / 26 April 2020

Q: What are the easiest vegetables to regrow?

A: Green onions are pretty easy to regrow. You can also do bulb onions, of course, but there’s lettuce, like romaine lettuce, beets, carrots, parsnips, potatoes, and even to a certain extent, cabbage. I think we kind of forget that when we buy many of these plants in the grocery store, they’re still alive. They’re not dead! They’ve been harvested from a field or from maybe a greenhouse and, given the right conditions, they can start to grow again.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

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