Transition Brockville archive

Category : Big picture (477)

New IPCC report offers climate solutions dependent on magic

Pacific Standard / Richard Heinberg / 08 October 2018

Over the past couple of decades, climate scientists have warned government leaders that global warming could pose an extinction-level threat to humanity. In response, policymakers have asked climate scientists for recommendations to stave off catastrophic global warming, just as long as these recommended policies wouldn’t curtail economic growth. Climate scientists, in turn, have come up with a series of proposals that are the equivalent of magic: They deliver desired results, but only if you believe in miracles. For the most part, everyone involved in this magic show has the right intentions. The problem is that we’re betting our entire future on fairy dust.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

How should we face the challenge of climate change?

Al Jazeera News / 14 September 2018

Much of the world’s attention this week has been focused on two powerful storms: Hurricane Florence in the United States and Super Typhoon Mangkhut in the Philippines.

The signs of climate change are everywhere, and what were once rare forces of nature are becoming almost regular events.

The Atlantic hurricane season lasts longer, and the storms are more powerful than they were a generation ago.

Across the continent, wildfires in California have burned one million acres (404,685 hectares) of land this year. Experts say the US wildfire season is 87 days longer than it was 30 years ago.

Europe has just come through a summer of record heat that saw wildfires break out above the Arctic circle.

Record rainfall in Japan triggered landslides that smashed homes and forced evacuations. That was followed by two weeks of severe heat.

But what can we do to tackle climate change?

Summer of fire, heat and flood puts a focus on adaptation

Globe and Mail / Shawn McCarthy / 07 September 2018

The deluge flooded downtown streets and basements of high-rise office towers, causing more than $80-million in damage and nearly drowning two men who were trapped in an elevator with the rising water.

The Aug. 7 downpour in Toronto dropped 72 millimetres of rain in the city centre in a few hours, the kind of storm that is expected only once every 100 years, according to Environment Canada. Bay Street towers, including TD Centre, took on storm water and lost power; service was disrupted at Toronto’s commuter hub, Union Station; and ground-floor meeting rooms were under water at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre.

The $80-million is for insured damages, the Insurance Bureau of Canada said on Friday. Uninsured costs were likely higher, while severe weather across the province has caused more than $1-billion in insured property damage, the bureau said.

It was a summer of fire, heat and flood in Canada.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Hot enough for you?

David Suzuki Foundation / David Suzuki, Ian Hanington / 22 August 2018

If you follow climate news (and you should), you’ve likely heard of the global warming “hiatus.” In attempts to keep the world hooked on diminishing reserves of polluting fossil fuels, climate science deniers seized on that phenomenon to claim the warming they once argued didn’t exist stopped. Others took up the false claim out of ignorance and fear.

Global warming didn’t stop. Quite the opposite: it accelerated. According to all legitimate scientific agencies that study climate, the past four years have been the warmest on record, and 2017 was the 41st consecutive year with global average temperatures higher than in the 20th century.

This year is also shaping up to be a record-breaker. But as the old saying goes, “You ain’t seen nothing yet!” That’s because warming didn’t stop. The rate slowed slightly. And that’s over now.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

AI, fake images and crumbling trust in our narratives

Resource Insights / Kurt Cobb / 19 August 2018

In a piece I wrote in 2014 I opined, “If you want to corrupt a people, corrupt the language.” I added, “Once it becomes impossible to say the truth with the language we have, it will ultimately be impossible for us to adapt and survive.”

In that piece I was complaining about what I dubbed “oil Newspeak,” an Orwellian lexicon created by the oil industry to deceive policymakers, investors and the public.

Of course, back then I concerned myself only with words. But with the increasing power of artificial intelligence (AI) enhanced software which is now available to average computer users, practically anyone can alter and/or create images and audio recordings that seem real, but which are entirely concocted. It means that comedian Richard Pryor’s famous line—”Who you gonna believe, me or your lying eyes?”—may very well morph from a joke into a serious question.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

More heat, drought and longer fire season in Canada’s future

Montreal Gazette / Anna Junker / 18 August 2018

Heat and drought. A longer fire season with more frequent wildfires and larger areas burned. That’s what’s in store for Canada, especially the prairie provinces, in the coming years, experts say, a situation that is being directly attributed to climate change.

In Canada, 2.5-million hectares — equivalent to about half the size of Nova Scotia — burn every year from wildfires on average. The annual destruction has more than doubled since about the 1970s, where numbers were around one million hectares.

Current projections forecast even warmer, drier conditions across the country, creating the perfect catalyst for more wildfires in the future.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

«page 1 of 80

The Transition Framework

Transition initiatives share many of the same goals as other groups, and work collaboratively with a variety of organizations in their local areas. Transition differs in that it focuses specifically on preparing communities for the changes associated with unprecedented resource depletion and transitioning away from fossil-fuel dependency.

— Transition U.S.
TB Projects

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Like to receive a monthly digest of our key posts plus local news and event listings?

Subscribe

View past issues

Subscribe to our Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Area Community Gardens