TB screens DiCaprio’s global warming documentary

Transition Brockville / 13 January 2017

Screening and discussion of Leonardo DiCaprio’s global warming documentary, Before the Flood, are the focus of the next presentation by Transition Brockville, Sunday, January 22, 2-4 p.m., at the Brockville Public Library.

Released the month before the U.S. federal election, the film follows Hollywood star DiCaprio, a United Nations Messenger of Peace, as he visits places around the world where global warming is having devastating effects, or where industrial activity on a massive scale leads to very high CO2 emissions.

Passionate about fighting climate change since he met Al Gore in 2000, DiCaprio interviews numerous people who support the need to reduce fossil fuels, as well as those whose goal is to continue producing them. Along the way, the viewer may reach conclusions on how to begin turning awareness of the problem into means of solving it.

Discussion of positive actions we can take as individuals and as a community will follow the film. Refreshments will be served. This presentation is free and open to the public; a free will donation to Transition Brockville, however, is always welcome.

15 ways to help reduce global carbon emissions

The Guardian / Chris Goodall / 19 January 2017

From cutting down on meat, to contacting your local representatives and investing in clean energy, here are 15 ways to help reduce global carbon emissions.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

2016 hottest year ever recorded – and human activity to blame

The Guardian / Damian Carrington / 18 January 2017

2016 was the hottest year on record, setting a new high for the third year in a row, with scientists firmly putting the blame on human activities that drive climate change.

The final data for 2016 was released on Wednesday by the three key agencies – the UK Met Office and Nasa and Noaa in the US – and showed 16 of the 17 hottest years on record have been this century.

Direct temperature measurements stretch back to 1880, but scientific research indicates the world was last this warm about 115,000 years ago and that the planet has not experienced such high levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere for 4m years.

In 2016, global warming delivered scorching temperatures around the world. The resulting extreme weather means the impacts of climate change on people are coming sooner and with more ferocity than expected, according to scientists.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Alternative investment options in the cleantech space

Corporate Knights / Jason Visscher / 11 January 2017

Canadians who want to invest in environmental solutions and clean technologies (cleantech) – the sector of companies that minimizes the impacts of non-renewable resource use – have several options. Some of these are available to retail investors wary of choosing individual stocks or volatile passive funds characterized by hype and cynicism.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

WEF: Climate change is the world’s biggest risk

Climate Central / Brian Kahn / 12 January 2017

The rise of the machines isn’t the biggest threat to humanity. It’s climate change, extreme weather and other environmental factors.

The World Economic Forum surveyed 750 experts on what the most likely and impactful risks facing humanity are in 2017. In a report released Thursday, they ranked extreme weather as the most likely risk and the second-most impactful, trailing only the use of weapons of mass destruction. Climate change is responsible for driving an increase in the likelihood and intensity of extreme weather events, notably heat waves.

Failing to adapt to or mitigate climate change and a host of other climate-connected risks including water and food crises and involuntary migration also rank in the top 10.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Introducing the new Transition Universities Guide

Transition Network / Maria Cooper / 09 January 2017

I went to university in St Andrews, Scotland, where we had a Transition University of St Andrews. Transition started out for me as something I just did to survive – it was cheaper to grow food than buy it, cheaper to swap clothes and books than buy them, and being outside planting trees or mending bikes was a life-giving contrast from the stuffy library and theoretical learning that otherwise filled my days to the brim. Besides, many of my friends and I often felt that sort of depression so prevalent among students: what difference am I making in the world? Who cares about yet another essay, being read by one tutor and then put on the pile of student pride or shame never to be looked at again?

Transition gave us something outside this bubble we could engage in, and crucially, learn skills that made us feel like we could actually be able to lead a good life in harmony with the planet.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Resilience is the ability of a system or community to withstand impacts from outside. An indicator is a good way of measuring that. Conventionally, the principal way of measuring a reducing carbon footprint is CO2 emissions. However, we firmly believe that cutting carbon while failing to build resilience is an insufficient response when you’re trying to address multiple shocks such as peak oil, climate change and the economic crisis together.

— Transition U.S.
Next Presentation

Feature documentary:
Before the Flood

Sunday, January 22, 2:00 pm
Brockville Public Library
23 Buell Street, Brockville

TB Projects

 

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