Transition Brockville celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2017

Transition Brockville / 26 March 2017

In March 2007, Brockville residents called a meeting of anyone interested in fighting climate change at the local level.

The Brockville Climate Action Group (BCAG), as it was called then, arose from that first well-attended meeting. The next month MP Gord Brown unveiled the group’s new website, and Mayor David Henderson congratulated the group’s initiative and hoped the City could use the group “as a resource in our efforts to do what we can for our environment.”

BCAG’s mission was to help identify personal and community-wide steps to both reduce carbon emissions and adapt to the climate changes and resource depletion that were already unavoidable.

Within a few months of its formation, the group began offering free public monthly presentations, in partnership with the Brockville Public Library, where they are held to this day. Expert speakers have enlightened the public on everything from renewable energy to green building, from degrowth to cooperative enterprises, from living closer to nature to nurturing our personal inner transitions to be more in tune with the needs of our changing world. Sometimes we screened timely documentaries. Other times we gathered for a potluck supper and open discussion.

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Hydrogen strategy touted as key to Ontario climate change plan

Nation Valley News / 24 November 2020

In the face of the intensifying climate crisis, the Ontario government has responded with a Made-in-Ontario Environment plan that includes blending hydrogen into natural gas.

The plan aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 30% below 2005 levels by 2030 — to be accomplished by powering vehicles, industrial processes, homes, and businesses across the province with the hydrogen-natural gas blend.

The government released a discussion paper, which will inform the province’s hydrogen strategy, and invites the public to provide feedback for a sixty-day consultation period.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

World is ‘doubling down’ on fossil fuels despite climate crisis

The Guardian / Damian Carrington / 2 December 2020

The world’s governments are “doubling down” on fossil fuels despite the urgent need for cuts in carbon emissions to tackle the climate crisis, a report by the UN and partners has found.

The researchers say production of coal, oil and gas must fall by 6% a year until 2030 to keep global heating under the 1.5C target agreed in the Paris accord and avoid “severe climate disruption”. But nations are planning production increases of 2% a year and G20 countries are giving 50% more coronavirus recovery funding to fossil fuels than to clean energy.

The Covid-19 pandemic is expected to cut production in 2020 by 7%, the report says, but this barely changes the total production expected by 2030. Countries are on track to produce more than double the amount of fossil fuels consistent with a 1.5C limit by that date.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Ontario hiking ethanol content in gasoline

Driving / Jonathan Juha / 27 November 2020

Ontario plans to raise by half the ethanol content required in gasoline in a move to fight climate change that could also benefit Southwestern Ontario’s vast corn belt.

The province says it will gradually increase the required ethanol content in gasoline to 15 per cent from 10 per cent by 2030.

Made from corn, most of which in Ontario is grown in Southwestern Ontario, ethanol is also produced in the region, home to major refiners in Sarnia, Chatham, and Aylmer.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

[TB: Corn and soy are being monocropped increasingly across the province, reducing biodiversity, destroying soils and polluting lands with chemical additives … and with virtually zero EROEI.]

Parcel delivery companies are trading trucks for bikes

CBC News / Emily Chung, Alice Hopton, Tashauna Reid / 28 November 2020

The Black Friday, Cyber Monday, pre-Christmas pandemic online shopping frenzy calls for huge fleets of trucks and vans to deliver those gadgets and gifts. But those road-clogging, polluting vehicles are starting to give way to a greener, more efficient option in many Canadian cities: e-cargo bikes and trikes.

FedEx started delivering packages in downtown Toronto using e-bikes over the summer and is now looking to expand the program to other cities in Canada.

Purolator and two smaller courier companies are part of a similar pilot called Project Colibri that launched in Montreal last year. Purolator has since expanded its bike fleet from one e-bike to six or seven, and Project Colibri has ramped up to 5,000 e-bike deliveries a week — nearly as many as it made over the last four months of 2019.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Climate ‘apocalypse’ fears stopping people having children

The Guardian / Damian Carrington / 27 November 2020

People worried about the climate crisis are deciding not to have children because of fears that their offspring would have to struggle through a climate apocalypse, according to the first academic study of the issue.

The researchers surveyed 600 people aged 27 to 45 who were already factoring climate concerns into their reproductive choices and found 96% were very or extremely concerned about the wellbeing of their potential future children in a climate-changed world. One 27-year-old woman said: “I feel like I can’t in good conscience bring a child into this world and force them to try and survive what may be apocalyptic conditions.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Hands-on learning, one nail at a time

Recorder & Times / Wayne Lowrie / 25 November 2020

It’s all part of a unique program by the Employment and Education Centre to give the young people hands-on experience in the trades.

Heather Brisebois, project co-ordinator, said the budding tradespeople will develop their skills under the supervision of trade professionals and learn by doing.

At the end of the 30-week program, the youths will have learned basic carpentry, plumbing, electrical wiring, drywalling, roofing – all of the skills that go into house construction.

And they will have built a house that will be donated to Habitat for Humanity to be used as affordable housing somewhere in the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
TB Projects

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