TB comments on Brockville’s draft Active Transportation Plan

Transition Brockville / 11 November 2019

How communities can build psychological resilience to disaster

National Observer / Nicole Westman / 08 November 2019

As climate change makes natural disasters more common and more extreme, cities and communities are working to improve their resilience—their ability to withstand disaster, and bounce back quickly when it occurs. But disasters don’t just cause physical damage; they can leave communities struggling mentally and emotionally, as well. Working to shore up physical structures only tackles part of the problem, says Gerald Galloway, a professor of civil and environmental engineering in the Center for Disaster Resilience at the University of Maryland. “If a community can’t stand on its own two feet psychologically, all the work on having stronger buildings isn’t going to get you anywhere.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Fourth Annual Fall Feast — another big success!

NFU Local 316 / Newsletter / 08 November 2019

For the fourth year in a row, the annual Local 316 Fabulous Farmers Fall Feast sold out ahead of the event and provided a delicious local food meal for 100 happy diners.

A team of volunteers, many of them local young farmers, prepared and served a three course meal featuring foods in season; Sharon and Will Freeman, of Freedom Farm, Battersea, led the team, with Sharon the self-described “chief cook and bottle-washer.”

The event included a silent auction featuring items donated by local businesses, craftspeople and individuals. About $4000 was raised for Local 316’s fund that supports learning opportunities for new and young farmers and helps fund climate change mitigation projects by area farmers.

[ more… ]

How big a problem is idling?

CBC News / 07 November 2019

When a gasoline-powered vehicle is idling, it is in its least efficient mode. It’s doing nothing but sitting there, burning fuel and sending emissions into the atmosphere.

Natural Resources Canada says if most Canadian drivers limited idling to three minutes a day, over the course of a year, 1.4 million fewer tonnes of CO2 emissions would go into the atmosphere.

It would save money, too. For every 10 minutes of idling, the average three-litre engine vehicle loses more than a litre of fuel, according to NRCan.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Multi-Sector Climate Impact Assessment

Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks / 07 November 2019

The assessment will help the province better understand where and how it is vulnerable to the effects of climate change, and will provide information to communities to help them undertake a more strategic approach to adaptation planning and infrastructure investments to prevent and mitigate climate change risks.

“Our government is taking action in the global fight to reduce emissions and strengthen our resilience to the impacts of climate change that are already happening in our communities, such as more frequent extreme weather events and flooding,” said Jeff Yurek, Minister of the Environment, Conservation and Parks. “This impact assessment will help the province, municipalities, Indigenous communities and other local partners make more informed and timely decisions to keep communities and people healthy and safe.”

[ FULL MEDIA RELEASE ]

Stark differences on bike lanes

Recorder & Times / Ronald Zajac / 06 November 2019

They are pedalling in opposite directions, but the two sides in Brockville’s bike lanes debate stayed in their lanes on Tuesday.

Supporters of the city’s proposed active transportation plan touted its health and social benefits, while opponents, focused mainly on plans to put bike lanes on Laurier Boulevard and Windsor Drive, worried about traffic safety in that area.

So intense was the interest in the matter that city council’s planning and operations committee moved the venue of Tuesday’s public meeting from city hall to the Brockville Arts Centre. But while the debate remains as polarized as ever, committee chairman Coun. Mike Kalivas thanked the many participants for keeping the debate civil and proceeding in a “very classy way.”

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Transition Towns are in the forefront of those preparing for the changes ahead. Transitioners understand that the climate-changed future is hugely unpredictable and unstable. They feel keenly the dilemma of our daily life dependence on a dominant economic system that is threatening that very life with its insistence on unending material consumption and use of fossil fuels.

— Transition Town Peterborough
TB Projects

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