High concentration of CO2 reduces man’s intellectual abilities

Skeptical Science / Marcin Popkiewicz / 17 November 2014

Impact-of-CO2-on-Human-Decision-Making-Performance-20141029Did you ever experience being at a lecture or a meeting in a room where you felt tired, your eyes were closing and no matter how hard you tried you could not concentrate? The reason did not have to be a boring subject or a mediocre lecturer – it is a common experience caused by high concentration of carbon dioxide in the air of a crowded and poorly ventilated conference room or a classroom.

People exhale carbon dioxide. If the room is crowded, small and poorly ventilated, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the air grows. When in turn we inhale such air, the carbon dioxide contained in it gets dissolved in our blood and reacts with water to create carbonic acid [H2CO3], which, in turn dissolves into ions of hydrogen [H+] and bicarbonate [HCO3−]. Increase in the concentration of hydrogen ions increases blood acidity and creates electrolyte imbalance, causing increased discomfort and decline in intellectual performance. We feel tired, numb and less capable of any mental or physical effort.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The inter-generational theft of Brexit and climate change

The Guardian / Dana Nuccitelli / 27 June 2016

brexit voting by ageFor much of the time during which developed nations experienced strong economic growth as a result of fossil fuel consumption, we were unaware of the associated climate costs. We can no longer use ignorance as an excuse. And yet the older generations, who experienced the greatest net benefit from carbon pollution, are now the least supportive of taking responsibility to pay for it. The longer we delay, the more devastating the consequences will be for the younger generations.

Similarly, today’s youth who are early in their career paths will face the harshest consequences of the Brexit vote that was dominated by older voters. As Jack Lennard put it:

This is a final middle-fingered salute to the young from the baby boomer generation. Not content with racking up insurmountable debt, not content with destroying any hopes of sustainable property prices or stable career paths, not content with enjoying the benefits of free education and generous pension schemes before burning down the ladder they climbed up, the baby boomers have given one last turd on the doorstep of the younger generation.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

The European Union and the misery of bigness

The Tyee / Andrew Nikiforuk / 23 June 2016

airships-610pxYears ago, the great Austrian economist Leopold Kohr argued that overwhelming evidence from science, culture and biology all pointed to one unending truth: things improve with an unending process of division.

The breakdown ensured that nothing ever got too big for its own britches or too unmanageable or unaccountable. Small things simply worked best.

Kohr pegged part of the problem with bigness as “the law of diminishing sensitivity.” The bigger a government or market or corporation got, the less sensitive it became to matters of the neighbourhood.

In the end bigness, just like any empire, concentrated power and delivered misery, corruption and waste.

And that’s the problem today with the European Union, big corporations, large governments and a long parade of big trade pacts.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Ontario launches new Social Enterprise Strategy

Ministry of Economic Development and Growth / 21 June 2016

ontario_logoOntario has launched a new five-year strategy that will help social enterprises grow their businesses, enter new markets and create jobs, while addressing complex social and environmental challenges.

Ontario’s Social Enterprise Strategy 2016-2021 sets out significant commitments in three key areas:

  • Equipping social enterprises with solid business fundamentals
  • Connecting social enterprises to markets and capital to grow and scale
  • Demonstrating the value of social enterprise and social finance to investors, government, and communities

Ontario will invest more than $6 million in the first year of this renewed strategy. The province will leverage Ontario’s existing entrepreneurship infrastructure, impact investment capital, and a growing market opportunity to support social enterprises.

[ FULL MEDIA RELEASE ]

Report: Accelerating Renewable Energy Co-operatives in Canada

Co-operatives and Mutuals Canada

Accelerating Renewable Energy Co-operatives in Canada ReportIn light of the growing urgency for, and national commitment to a de-carbonised economy combined with the need for local economic drivers and community resiliency, community energy offers a win-win-win solution.

Community energy (CE), which broadly refers to community ownership of and participation in renewable energy projects, is considered an economically positive and (increasingly) a socially necessary approach to the low carbon economy. CE projects are developed under various ownership models (or legal structures) such as: renewable energy co‑ops; by Aboriginal communities and corporations; through local investment funds; not-for-profit organizations; and the MUSH sector (Municipalities, Universities, Schools and Hospitals). What is common to CE is the retention of project control and benefit (especially financial) at the community level.

On assignment to Co‑operatives and Mutuals Canada (CMC), TREC Renewable Energy Co‑op and the People, Power, Planet Partnership, undertook an assessment of the status of renewable energy co‑ops across Canada. While the reporting on status is specific to the co‑op model, the comments made in this report about development challenges and recommended solutions applies broadly to other forms of community energy models.

[ DOWNLOAD THE REPORT ]

It felt like 160 F (71 C) in India on June 13, 2016

RobertScribbler.com / 21 June 2016

According to Earth Nullschool, it felt like 41 to 54 C [104 to 127 F] outside over Eastern India on June 12th and 13th of 2016 due to combined high levels of heat and humidity. Local reports from Bhubaneswar indicate that this Misery Index hit a stunning 71 C [160 F] on June 13th. Image source: Earth Nullschool.
According to Earth Nullschool, it felt like 41 to 54 C [104 to 127 F] outside over Eastern India on June 12th and 13th of 2016 due to combined high levels of heat and humidity. Local reports from Bhubaneswar indicate that this Misery Index hit a stunning 71 C [160 F] on June 13th. Image source: Earth Nullschool.
An unconfirmed report out of Bhubaneswar indicates that temperatures on June 13th hit 103.5 F (39.7 C) even as relative humidity readings were at 87 percent. That’s a wet bulb reading of 37.6 C. And if this report is true, that means it felt like 160 degrees Fahrenheit or 71 degrees Celsius for a brief period in Bhubaneswar that day. If so, this would be the highest Misery Index value ever recorded on the planet — nearly hitting last year’s peak measure in Iraq of a 163 F or 73 C heat index (38.4 C wet bulb) reading. And outright crushing periods during 2015 when India’s wet bulb measures in Andhra Pradesh hit 30 C.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

Inner Transition is occasionally overlooked in favour of more immediately ‘practical’ undertakings, reinforcing an observed and acknowledged division in many Transition Initiatives between “doers” and “talkers”, but for Transition Initiatives looking to foster a kind of community resilience that is equitable, inclusive, nimble, responsive, caring, and cohesive, Inner Transition efforts are a necessary place to start.

— Anne Rucchetto, Blake Poland
Next Presentation

Lyndsay Price, City of Brockville: Talking Trash

Sunday, July 24, 2:00 pm
West Pavilion, St. Lawrence Park
King Street West, Brockville

TB Projects

 

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