Explore some Life Hacks on Feb. 27

Transition Brockville / 13 February 2019

Inspiring children to appreciate real food

Mother Earth News / Rebecca Harrold / 25 January 2019

Real food has become a high priority in our lives. We want our children to understand the difference between food and food-like substances. We want them to choose real food. As a result, we’ve given much thought to integrating an appreciation for real food into our family’s culture. Below is a list of some thoughts we’ve compiled on ways to teach children about truly nourishing food. We’ve done each of these suggestions to some extent and our children are more knowledgeable about food than their peers, and even if they find a dish unappealing, are swayed to give it a try knowing that we would only serve them what is best for them. Though they still let us know they don’t like it!

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Climate change a walk between hope and despair, Saxe says

Kingston Whig / Elliot Ferguson / 17 January 2019

The challenge of combating climate change is a stark choice between hope and despair, both of which have a role to play, Ontario’s environment commissioner says.

Speaking at the second annual Kingston Climate Change Symposium on Thursday, Dianne Saxe said human-made climate change is the most pressing challenge facing the planet.

But it was easy to give in to despair as Saxe outlined the impact of climate change, both today and forecast for the coming decades.

“Anyone who works on climate change walks a knife edge between hope and despair,” Saxe said during her keynote address to the second annual symposium. “A lot of people think climate change is about polar bears and something that is going to happen sometime. It is here.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

25 tips for going local without going crazy

New Society Publishers / Julia Shanks, Brett Grohsgal / 04 April 2016

Locally sourced and seasonally raised foods taste better, and are better for you. They spend more time in the fields ripening – developing sweetness and flavor – because they don’t need to be picked under-ripe for shipping. Picking under-ripe vegetables also reduces the nutritional value. Farmers can grow more diverse varieties, bred for quality and flavor rather than long shelf life. And though a region may experience a drought or unusually cold weather for a season, the fruits and vegetables still grow at their optimal time, ensuring the best possible taste. Picking under-ripe vegetables reduces the nutritional value.

Buying local also benefits the environment and economy.

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

Brockville’s Active Transportation plan invites your input

City of Brockville / Matthew Locke

The Social Pinpoint engagement site for the Brockville Active Transportation Plan invites your input:

1. Browse the concept tab for ideas about different active transportation facilities and terminology.

2. Drag and drop pins onto the map to tell us your active transportation experiences in Brockville (walking, cycling, etc).The map shows existing active transportation facilities and previously proposed trails.

3. Complete the survey questions in the sidebar tab.

To provide your input and for more information, please visit the project webpage at https://brockville.com/activetransportation. The online engagement for this phase of the project will close in mid-March 2019.

Kingston’s climate change strategy is number one in country

TVO Current Affairs / David Rockne Corrigan / 14 December 2018

The municipality that has billed itself as “Canada’s most sustainable city” since 2009 now has some solid evidence to back up the claim.

The November issue of the journal Climatic Change contains a ranking of the climate-change plans of 63 Canadian municipalities — and Kingston comes out on top.

Plans were evaluated based on eight criteria, including how a community sets its climate goals, how effective those goals are, and how it measures and achieves progress.

Municipalities are the “most vulnerable” of all levels of government when it comes to climate change, explains lead author Dave Guyadeen, of the University of Guelph, because they face the most immediate impacts. ”So we wanted to know how they are responding to it,” he says.

So what lessons can Kingston offer other municipalities trying to come up with or improve climate-change plans?

[ FULL ARTICLE ]

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The Transition Framework

What the Transition movement does incredibly well is small-scale experiments which are practical, which resonate with local people, which look as if they’re doable, and that can engage people at a practical and meaningful level. It connects up the big issues and the local issues and shows you that change can happen at a local level.

— Julian Dobson, 21 Stories of Transition
TB Projects

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